NEW Pizzicato and NEW Live Video

Ietsie Pietsie Pizzicato by Willyne Hammerstein

You certainly know how to keep me busy. I’ve been listening.

  1. New Shapes! Ietsie Pietsie Pizzicato, which I am calling Pizzicato for short.
  2. New Live Video! Friday Night 7 pm Eastern

Ietsie Pietsie Pizzicato by Willyne Hammerstein

PIZZICATO
The Ietsie Pietsie Pizzicata shape collection is ready now! It is one of Willyne Hammerstein’s brilliant designs in Millefiori Quilts 3.

As usual, there is a LOW intro price for one week only.

Russ reads every word of every shape collection out loud to help me proofread. He laughed every time he read “Ietsie Pietsie Pizzicato.” I have never heard these words before but I can confidently say that he did not pronounce any part of it correctly.

Ietsie Pietsie is a bit like Itsy Bitsy.

Pizzicato is a playing technique that involves plucking the strings of string instrument, like a violin or guitar.

I will probably never pronounce any of this correctly. I learned how to read with phonics before I was old enough to go to kindergarten. I pronounce words with a Canadian accent and the way they are spelled. Here is a pronunciation link for the purists.

Print Hexagons on Fabric

My pronunciation may be suspect but the shapes to print on fabric are absolutely perfect. You will love the results when you start with precise shapes!

Ietsie Pietsie Pizzicato templates

Ietsie Pietsie Pizzicato includes new sizes of hexagons, diamonds, triangles, and stars. It is a great addition to your collection of collections!

LIVE VIDEO 08
Your reaction to the live videos energizes me. I’ve been getting ready for another one. I hope you will join the fun.

This time, I will share tips for finding what shapes are available, what to do when you are just missing one or two shapes, and how to make a request. This sounds straightforward but I have a LOT to show you!

The list of requests seems to get longer every day. When I took the shape collection for Ietsie Pietsie Pizzicato off the list, I added three more.

The original plan was to announce Pizzicato in the live video but I have prepared so many  good demos that I could be talking all night, so you are hearing about it now.

Inklingo Live Video

HOW TO WATCH LIVE
Go to the Inklingo Facebook Page.

When: Friday, April 6, 7 pm Eastern Time. World Time Buddy tells you what time that is in your time zone.

There is no sound until you hover over the video and click on the speaker icon in the lower right corner. The video should play immediately but if it doesn’t, please refresh the page.

Please tell your friends too because Google (gmail) and Yahoo have changed the email rules to make it harder for blog emails to be delivered.

Ietsie Pietsie Pizzicato by Willyne Hammerstein

FACEBOOK IS GETTING GREEDIER
Some of you may have noticed that I have not been posting as often on Facebook. When I post something, Facebook often only shows it to 50-150 of the 44,800+ quilters who have liked the page.

That means that even if you have liked the Inklingo Facebook Page you probably are not getting my photos in your timeline. Facebook wants me to pay every time I post something to show it to a few more quilters—never everyone—so it is up to you to visit.

REPLAYS ON THE BLOG
Watching live and interacting with comments is great fun but every video is also available to watch later. When I post the replays on the blog, I add links and extra info. There is a list under the Video tab on the website. Video Tab

ARE YOU SUBSCRIBED?
There are new rules this year. Please subscribe and add linda@lindafranz.com to your contact list if you want to continue receiving emails when there is something new on the blog.

Introduction to Inklingo

PRINTING ON FABRIC
If you want a little review or a short introduction to printing on fabric, this 8 minutes is Time Well Spent. There is also another very short video on the Main Beginner’s Page showing how to prepare fabric sheets for printing with an Inkjet.

Ietsie Pietsie Pizzicato by Willyne Hammerstein

Here are the links again.

1. Ietsie Pietsie Pizzicato Only $20 for a limited time. I also add a Design Book as a bonus!

2. Facebook Live Video Friday Night

I hope I will see comments from you today and on Friday! Thank you for visiting today.

Linda & Monkey

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New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Main Beginner’s Page  There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon! 11 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo on Facebook

Inklingo on The Quilt Show with Ricky Tims and Diane Kirkhart

Welcome to visitors from The Quilt Show!

Ricky Tims and Diane Kirkhart talk about Inklingo

SHOW 2205  
Diane Kirkhart shows Ricky Tims how to use Inklingo to print, cut  and sew Passacaglia shapes to make the cover quilt on Millefiori Quilts by Willyne Hammerstein (first book).

Diane has made several glorious Passacaglia variations with various methods. Spectacular!

Diane is a fan of Inklingo and I was excited to see how she demonstrated it.

In the first 40 minutes, Diane demonstrates gluing templates for English Paper Piecing (EPP) and then gluing to zig zag by machine with Apliquick tools .

Monkey says they saved the best for last. (We’re partial.)

Inklingo on The Quilt Show

START PRINTING WITH THE FREE SHAPES
I am delighted that Diane mentioned that you can try printing on fabric with the free shape collection. Inklingo is designed to work with a computer and any ordinary Inkjet printer, so anyone can try it, as Diane says, “without spending a dime.”

Diane only had a few minutes to show the printed shapes, so if you are curious about how Inklingo works, there is an 8-minute video on the Main Beginner’s Page —and that is where to order the free shapes.

If you do order the free shapes, please let me know that you heard about Inklingo from Diane on The Quilt Show.

A free fabric sample will be sent to you to get you started! (USA and Canada only)

Silent Garden with Inklingo

FUSSY CUT WITH INKLINGO
I am delighted that Diane had a chance to mention that you can fussy cut with Inklingo.

Her method is different from the two methods I teach:

Inklingo on The Quilt Show

Not a member—yet? For one week in March, non-members will be able watch her episode too. Very nice.

I have been a member at The Quilt Show continuously since day one, January 1, 2007. I think that watching one TQS sample video might convince you to become a member too.

Inklingo on The Quilt Show

When Diane showed Ricky a piece of fabric printed and still attached to the freezer paper, he “got it.” He asked some great questions. He understood immediately that you do not need paper templates or acrylic templates or glue or special tools when you use Inklingo, so it is the most economical AND the fastest way to make a quilt.

Inklingo makes it easier for anyone to start quilting AND it makes it possible to make elaborate quilts like Passacaglia in a reasonable amount of time, at a reasonable price.

LOVE VIDEO?
If Diane’s wonderful introduction makes you want to know more about Millefiori Quilts, there is another short video on the Main Millefiori Quilts Page (under the Shop tab) showing how to sew Passacaglia by hand OR by machine with Inklingo—in only 6 minutes.

If you love learning from videos as much as I do, you might want to watch some of the replays of my Live Inklingo Videos too.

Print templates with Inklingo

ARE YOU SUBSCRIBED?
Please remember that you cannot count on Facebook to show you anything from Inklingo anymore, even when you have liked the Inklingo Facebook Page. If you like, comment and share on my page, Facebook is more likely to remind you to visit to see what is new.

It is also a good idea to subscribe to the blog, so you don’t miss anything. If you do subscribe, you will receive 4 to 8 emails per month—only when there is something new.
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Introduction to Inklingo

If you want to share info about Inklingo with friends, this short video is a good intro.

Diane Kirkhart on The Quilt Show

Congratulations to Diane on a great show! Now that you’ve met her, I think you will want to visit her website to see her Passacaglia quilts too!

Linda & Monkey

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New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Main Beginner’s Page  There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon! 11 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo on Facebook

NEW LeMoyne Star 8 inch for Lucky Stars

I published a new shape collection yesterday and announced it on the Inklingo Facebook page but I was sewing and watching hockey with Russ last night, so I did not finish this for the blog until this morning.
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Inklingo LeMoyne Star

As usual, the special LOW intro price on the new shape collection is good for a few days only.

$25 is fabulous value!
$20 is even better. LeMoyne Star 8 inch
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Millefiori Quilts 3 Lucky Stars

This time, I included two bonus shapes—a pentagon and a square. They are perfect for Lucky Stars, one of the great designs in Millefiori Quilts 3 (third book) by Willyne Hammerstein.
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LeMoyne Star 8 inch for Lucky Stars

The original quilt uses 12 cm stars (about 4.7 inches), so the quilt is bigger when you use 8 inch stars.

Center of the original quilt (no borders) – approx 37 x 51 inches.
Center of quilt with 8 inch blocks – approx 64 x 88 inches.
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Print star templates

You do not need papers or acrylic templates with Inklingo, so it is less expensive AND easier to sew Lucky Stars this way, especially if you get the low intro price.
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Millefiori Quilts 3 by Willyne Hammerstein book-on-paper

The instructions for Lucky Stars are in Willyne’s beautiful Millefiori 3 book. I think you know by now why this book is my favorite of the three.
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Live Video 05 with Linda Franz

In the 5th LIVE Inklingo Video on Facebook, I shared piecing and pressing instructions for LeMoyne Stars and a one-page guide to print and keep beside the sewing machine.

You can sew these stars by hand, if you prefer, of course, when you have the lines printed on the fabric with Inklingo.

FREE SHAPES FOR LEMOYNE STAR – SINCE 2008
Tens of thousands of quilters have downloaded the free shape collection and followed the instructions to sew stars.

I always recommend starting with the Diamond Triangle Square shape collection ($20 value) because it includes the first chapter of The Inklingo Handbook (pages H5 – H48) and some great shapes to print on fabric.

.Inklingo Diamonds for LeMoyne Star

MORE DIAMONDS –  45°
There are MANY other sizes of 45° Diamonds available for Castle Wall, Celestial Star, Feathered Star, Hunter’s Star, Key West Beauty and Midnight Fireworks. You can see them all in the Index of Shapes, Diamond Page (under the Support & Goodies tab on the website).

The Index of Shapes is divided into categories to help you find other shapes too.
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Introduction to Inklingo

There is a short VIDEO on the Welcome to Inklingo page on the website to help you start printing with the FREE shapes.

FACEBOOK HAS CHANGED!
If you have been following the news, you know that you cannot count on Facebook to show you anything from the pages you have liked anymore. Facebook has made major changes.

If you want to see what I post on Facebook, it is a good idea to

  • choose the option to “follow” the Inklingo page
  • like, comment, and share my photos and videos

These steps make it more likely that Facebook will show you anything on the Inklingo Facebook Page but there is no guarantee, so it is good idea to visit frequently on your own.

I don’t post as frequently on the blog as I post on Facebook, but it is a good idea to subscribe here too.

I am planning another live video on Facebook, so please stay tuned! In the meantime, I think you  love this new, versatile size. LeMoyne Star 8 inch

Linda & Monkey

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New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Main Beginner’s Page  There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon! 11 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo on Facebook

Encore Presentation of the Fifth LIVE Inklingo Video


ENCORE PRESENTATION
Thank you to everyone who watched LIVE on Saturday night. You can watch the replay here and I am sharing the links I promised.

As usual, you can click in the bottom right corner of the video to view larger or full screen. That is great for the close-up sewing sequences. (You can view full screen on Facebook too.)
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Encore Live Inklingo Video 05

WRONG CAMERA
I did it again. I clicked on the wrong button when I changed screens, so you saw this when you should have seen me sewing.

The good news is . . ..

Live Inklingo Video 05

. . . . that you can skip ahead and not miss anything.

When you play the video (the first image above), you can click on the play line (blue line above) to drag it forward to about -22 minutes (red arrow) to skip ahead.  I repeated myself, so you won’t miss anything if you skip ahead.

I’m sorry for making this mistake and sorry it took me a few minutes to see it. Thank you to everyone who tried to alert me on Facebook.

I appreciate your patience while I am learning this complicated software and equipment.  Monkey says, we’re making progress because I did get it right several other times.

Printing on fabric is more my speed. I was not cut out to be a technical whiz—but I try.
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LeMoyne Stars on Chair

Did you notice my desk chair?

For the videos, I sit in a dining room chair, so I can use my usual chair as a bulletin board.

Just like Inklingo, the simplest option is often the best.

AS PROMISED—LINKS MENTIONED IN THE LIVE VIDEO .
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One Page Guide for 8-pointed stars

The demo in the video is summarized in an article from 2014, where everything is illustrated and you can download the one-page guide for 8-pointed stars.
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Inklingo On-Point Quilt with LeMoyne Stars

I had a great quilt layout for stars to show you but I ran out of time. The free pattern uses the FREE Diamond Triangle Square shape collection and has been on the blog since 2011.
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How to press LeMoyne Stars

I also wanted to finish talking about the advantages of the pressing technique in the video. For now, I’ll just mention that when you press the seam allowances clockwise around the center in all of the stars, the seam allowances will nest perfectly when you join the star blocks together. 

We press the same way when we hand piece, so I will talk more about the advantages of this pressing technique in another LIVE video.
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Cathi's itty bitty LeMoyne Stars

I shared this LeMoyne Star quilt (3 inch blocks!) from Cathi’s Quilt Obsession Blog. If you visit there and search for LeMoyne, you will find many more star designs. I recommend subscribing to Cathi’s blog too.
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LeMoyne Star by Kathy Timmons

I also had this photo teed up to show you. Kathy’s fussy cutting is fabulous and . . .
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LeMoyne Star by Kathy in Mexico

. . . you can see the fussy cutting in dozens of stars, close up on Flicker.
Aren’t you glad you visited today! There are many other Inklingo projects in Kathy’s amazing Flickr albums.
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Midnight Fireworks Quilt

Midnight Fireworks from Millefiori Quilts (first book) is another Inklingo shape collection that uses 8-pointed stars. You can use the technique in the video for those stars too.
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Patchwork of the Crosses by machine

I sewed several hexagons by machine in the video but I ran out of time to show you how I use them for Patchwork of the Crosses. My hybrid POTC has some seams by machine and some seams by hand.
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Patchwork of the Crosses by machine

You saw me join the white hexagons by machine, sewing crosshair to crosshair. That leaves me with some relaxing, portable “continuous stitching” for 16 short seams. Hybrid piecing gives me the best of both worlds. 

I also mentioned a few more links.

Live Video 05 with Linda Franz

LIVE —NEW MISTAKES NEXT TIME 
By now, you know that I am technically challenged. Printing on fabric is one of the easiest things you can do with a computer. Managing live video must be one of the hardest but I’m not giving up yet.
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Introduction to Inklingo

Here’s another video that is NOT live, so there are no built-in mistakes. 8 minutes to get you started printing free shapes on fabric.

IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT FACEBOOK
It is up to YOU to make sure Facebook shows you what you want to see.

On January 11th, Facebook made some big changes. They only show the videos and images I show on the Inklingo Facebook page to fewer than 1% of the 44,780 quilters who have liked the page UNLESS I PAY THEM.

“Pay to play” is how Facebook makes billions. This means that your Facebook feed is going to give priority to businesses that pay for ads.

I am keeping the videos free, so I cannot afford to pay hundreds of dollars to notify you when the next one is coming.

There are a few things you can do that don’t cost anything:

  • Visit the Inklingo Facebook Page regularly. The more you like and comment and SHARE, the more likely Facebook is to decide to show you my photos and videos next time.
  • Choose “follow” on the Inklingo Facebook Page. No guarantee—but you are more likely to see my photos.
  • Subscribe to the blog, so you get an email when I post here. The link is at the top of the right side-bar (or below the content on mobile).
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Millefiori Quilts 3 Lucky Stars

COMING SOON
Exciting news in the video—a new shape collection for LeMoyne Star 8 inch is coming in the next few days. It also includes bonus shapes, so you can make Lucky Stars, one of the beautiful designs in Millefiori Quilts 3.

I hope you will tell your friends about the LIVE videos and come back again next time.

It is odd to talk to a camera without being able to see you, so your comments on Facebook and here are a lifeline. Thank you!

Linda & Monkey

[]

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Main Beginner’s Page  There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon! 11 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo on Facebook

Encore Presentation of the First LIVE Inklingo Video

Live Video - Print on fabric

Thank you to everyone who watched the first Inklingo LIVE video!

Other than the sound breaking up at times (for some), it went more smoothly than I expected and I think you could sense my excitement!

I did not expect it but Facebook made the video available for replay soon after we finished it. Very cool. (We’re learning as we go along.) If you tuned in late or had to leave early, you can still see it all, here or on the Inklingo Facebook Page..

The sound will be muted until to click the little speaker icon in the bottom right corner.

UPDATE MARCH 2018
For a few minutes near the end, I was talking about one thing and showing another, but I figured out how to edit it, so it is easier to understand how to navigate in the PDFs. It is also a few minutes shorter and available on YouTube.

Please share the video with your friends.

Special thanks to Raylene, for emailing me a photo of her Passacaglia quilt top (above). It caused a sensation! Of course, in my excitement, I mispronounced Passacaglia AGAIN but I think you know what I meant. It is the brilliant design by Willyne Hammerstein in the first Millefiori Quilts book.

 

Inklingo demonstration LIVE

I was amazed that all of the equipment worked (except the printing delay) and absolutely thrilled that so many of you tuned in on such short notice. It has been viewed more than 7,300 times already.

 

Inklingo quilters around the world

WHERE ARE INKLINGO QUILTERS?

EVERYWHERE!

Your comments made it fun for me. When I skimmed through them, I found notes from quilters in New Zealand (missing above?), France, Belgium, England, Scotland, Portugal, South Africa, Argentina, Australia (including a few from Tasmania), Brazil, Spain, Denmark, . . . and Canada and the US, of course.

Isn’t it fabulous that we can be connected this way!!

I cannot tell where everyone was but quilters left comments in at least 33 different US states. In no particular order, AR, NJ, KY, IN, HI, OK, IL, WI, ID, KS, CO, FL, NC, MO, WV, AK, MI, IA, GA, TX, NM, MN, ME, PA, OH, CT, CA, AZ, UT, MD, and I probably missed some. Almost ALL Canadian provinces were represented too.

Where were you?

 

2 MINUTE CLIP

I got good feedback on the freezer paper tips near the end and despite an unexpected computer failure this morning, I was able to create a new two-minute clip, so you can get a taste of what it was like live and get two cool tips, if you are too busy printing and sewing to watch the whole thing yet. (If you are as behind as I am, the Christmas lights aren’t up yet.)

By the way, I could have mentioned that if you let the FP cool on the ironing board for a moment, the curl comes out even better.

 

Inklingo Print Dialog Box

I have done some trouble-shooting with my computer guru, Charles, and we think we know why the print dialog box froze for such a long time, and if we are right, it will be fine next time.

PRIZES – TWO $20 GIFT CERTIFICATES

When we realized there were more than 200 comments, Monkey decided we needed two prizes, so we have two prize winners!

  • Barbara Bishop
  • Sharon Kay Payne

Please contact me by email, so I can send you each a $20 Gift Certificate to use for anything at Inklingo.com.

I thought I would be able to number the comments in Facebook and use Random.com to pick a number but it didn’t work. A friend suggested that since the video lasted 60 minutes—exactly, amazing—I could use Random.com to pick a number between 1 and 60 and the winner would be the comment or email that came in at that time. Cool solution. It picked two winners from the Facebook comments. (There were fewer than 400 emails. LOL)

 

As promised, here are links to some of the pages I mentioned in the video:

I meant to show you 1 inch squares in the Index of Shapes and I showed you 1 inch hexagons instead. Can you find the SIX shape collections with 1 inch squares on your own?

 

Linda Franz Live video

I was impressed that Donna and Cynthia noticed the chocolates sitting on top of the printer but I was extremely disappointed that no one pointed out that I wore an outfit that looked like the Canadian flag (white in the center with two red bars), despite mentioning Canada several times. Monkey says, why do I even bother, eh?

Nevertheless, I am very grateful for your enthusiasm and support. Thanks to your suggestions, we have several ideas for future LIVE videos. I am looking forward to doing this again, as soon as we get some extra RAM and new USB controllers for the computer tower.

Thank you for visiting here and thank you for watching LIVE!

I hope it was Time Well Spent, so you will want to come again next time and bring a friend.

Linda & Monkey

[]

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Main Beginner’s Page  There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon! 11 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo on Facebook

Fussy Cutting with Inklingo – Part 4

Passacaglia rosette fussy cut with Inklingo

In Part 3, I showed you how to use Inklingo for traditional “Swiss cheese fussy cutting” and I explained Template Rule # 1:

Always use templates without seam allowances.

 

Millefiori Quilts by Willyne Hammerstein

In Part 3, the example was Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses.

This time it is Passacaglia rosettes and I am sharing bonus tips for using freezer paper templates. (Passacaglia is the quilt on the cover of Millefiori Quilts by Willyne Hammerstein.)

This is another very long article. I considered breaking it into several parts but I hope you will find it helpful to have everything in one place.

 

Use templates without seam allowances

If you have been using metal, acrylic, or plastic templates with seam allowances for Passacaglia rosettes (or any design), you will love how much simpler and more accurate it is to work with templates without seam allowances!

This article focuses on fussy cutting shapes for Passacaglia rosettes but the info is helpful any time you need templates, whether you are sewing by hand or by machine.

Freezer paper templates are a wonderful method for fussy cutting in situations where Inklingo No Waste Fussy Cutting (see Part 2) is not an option.

If you haven’t used freezer paper (FP) before, I think you will be amazed by the advantages!

FP is the best template material and it costs almost nothing compared to the alternatives. There is an article about it (what it is, etc.) under the Top Ten Tutes tab (above).

 

How to make templates

You probably have everything already!

  • freezer paper
  • scissors or a rotary cutter and mat
  • an acrylic ruler (for rotary cutting)
  • a thin ruler and mechanical pencil (for marking seam lines, if required)
  • 1/2 inch strip of paper (useful for spacing templates to allow for two 0.25 inch seam allowances)
  • optional: highlighter marker

You do NOT need acrylic, plastic or metal templates, so this method is inexpensive and better!

 

Window template and template without seam allowances

STEP 1

Make window templates and templates without seam allowances. Both are made with freezer paper.

As I explained in Part 3, I print the shapes on freezer paper with Inklingo to make both of these templates. However, you can trace the shapes from the Millefiori Quilts book. Tracing is free. Printing is precise and fast.

(You don’t need the window template if you aren’t fussy cutting.)

 

Freezer paper templates

There are two choices:

(1) Print the shapes with seam allowances on freezer paper (above). Chop the freezer paper into individual pentagons (above). When you cut out the center, each can be used for a window template and a template without seam allowances, so you get both from the same page.
(2) Print the window template and the template without seam allowances separately on two pieces of freezer paper (below).

CUT THE WINDOW  Rotary cut on the stitching lines to accurately cut the template without seam allowances AND get a window template. It is okay to cut a little beyond the seam ending as long as the window template still holds together. Try to work in good light so the ruler does not cast a shadow. (Cut with scissors, if you prefer.)

REPAIR TIP  If you cut too far (or if a freezer paper template rips), you can repair it with another layer of FP. Iron the plastic side of the damaged template to the paper side of an FP patch. (Trim to size, if necessary.) Freezer paper templates never wear out.

CUTTING TIP  We use the same method for cutting paper as we use for cutting fabric. Plant the blade on the line first and then nudge the ruler into position. It improves accuracy and is safer. (See the free Diamond Triangle Square shape collection, page H28-H29 for more rotary cutting tips.)

You can cut with scissors if you prefer but if the lighting is good, rotary cutting is fast and accurate.

TIP  Make enough. In this case, I have 10 window templates and 10 templates without seam allowances because I will be fussy cutting 10 pentagons. You can work with fewer but you don’t have to.

 

FP templates without seam allowances

If you prefer, you can print two sheets of freezer paper, one with seam allowances (first photo) and one without seam allowances (this photo).

There are two reasons you might want to print the two templates separately.

  • You might find it easier to rotary the shapes without seam allowances than to carefully carve out the window template.
  • When you cut the layout without seam allowances, the matching marks are included along the seams.

CUTTING TIP  This layout of pentagons (no seam allowances) can be rotary cut but it might not be obvious at first glance. Sometimes you have to examine a layout for a moment to understand where to start. For this layout, rotary cut horizontal rows first to make it easier to rotary cut the shapes apart. As usual, plant the blade on the line first and then nudge the ruler into position.

SPEED TIP  You can print one sheet of freezer paper (no seam allowances), layer it with 3 or 4 unprinted sheets and rotary cut several layers at a time. It is helpful to strategically staple the sheets together, so nothing shifts while you are cutting.

Layouts of shapes without seam allowances are always included in Inklingo shape collections for the special times when you need templates.

 

Use a hi-liter to mark the edges

SAVE-YOUR-EYES TIP  Use a highlighter to make it easier to see the edges of the freezer paper against white background fabric. Just run the highlighter around the edges of each shape. Work on a piece of scrap paper, so you can get all the way to the edge of the template.

That is Step 1. It is all about preparing the two templates. They never wear out and they are easy to store in an envelope between uses.

Template Rule # 1 – Always use templates without seam allowances.

 

Window template on the wrong side of the fabric

STEP 2 – FIND A DESIGN YOU WANT TO FUSSY CUT

The design might be an individual flower or other motif. The window template makes it easy to see what will show when the shape is sewn because it does not include the seam allowances. (One of many reasons to use templates without seam allowances!)

Check to see if the design shows clearly on the wrong side of the fabric (above). This is the case with many fabrics.

If possible, I always work on the wrong side of the fabric when I expect to mark sewing lines (below) because it saves an extra step .

 

Window template for pentagon

STEP 3 – PRESS THE WINDOW TEMPLATES IN POSITION

On the ironing surface, press the window templates in position over identical designs until you have enough. Use a hot, dry iron. (No steam.)

It is better when you can position templates on straight grain but you can usually ignore it to get the design you want. Pentagons are always going to have some bias edges anyway.

 

10 Window Templates for Passacaglia

In this example, I need 10 pentagons, so I have 10 window templates pressed on the wrong side of the fabric.

This is going to make Swiss cheese of a lot of fabric. This is one of the reasons Inklingo No Waste Fussy Cutting is always my first choice!

 

Add template to window

STEP 4 – PRESS THE TEMPLATE INSIDE THE WINDOW

Still on the ironing surface, place the FP shape WITHOUT seam allowances into the window opening and press it into position.

Each identical design is now marked with two pieces of FP, the window and the center (above).

 

Peel off the window template

STEP 5 – PEEL OFF THE WINDOW TEMPLATE

Still at the ironing surface, peel off the window template leaving the template without seam allowances in position. Check the points/corners to make sure they are all identical. Re-press if necessary.

This template won’t move while I cut! Perfect!

You can use the window template over and over and over again, so put it in a safe place.

 

Add the seam allowance when you cut

STEP 6 – ADD THE SEAM ALLOWANCE WHEN YOU CUT

Slide a cutting mat underneath and cut around the FP, adding the seam allowances.

The highlighted edges are great when the fabric is a light color.

RULER TIP  Use masking tape on the under-side of the ruler to mark the seam allowance. Position the edge of the masking tape (full width) along the appropriate line and rotary cut to trim the excess. (This is easier than fiddling with pre-cut, narrow strips of masking tape.)

SCISSORS TIP  You can cut with scissors, if it is easier. With a small amount of practice, you might be surprised how easy it is to “eye-ball” an accurate seam allowance. If you are going to mark the sewing line, matches, and crosshairs (below), the seam allowances don’t have to be perfectly uniform. Otherwise, you can rough-cut a generous seam allowance and trim with a rotary cutter.

 

Passacaglia with a running stitch

SEAM ALLOWANCE TIP  If you will be sewing with a running stitch (recommended), 0.25 inch is perfect for most shapes. If you will be using English Paper Piecing, you might want to use a wider seam allowance. When you use templates without seam allowances, the width of the seam allowances is your choice.

 

Use a mechanical pencil and a thin ruler

STEP 7 – MARK THE SEWING LINES (IF REQUIRED)

Still on the cutting mat, mark the stitching lines, crosshairs and matching marks to imitate the results you get when you print the shapes on fabric with Inklingo (below)–fine, accurate lines.

Use a thin, flexible ruler, so you can extend the lines beyond the edge of the FP to create crosshairs. A thin ruler doesn’t cast a shadow. An ordinary mechanical pencil is fine in most cases but there are other colors available.

In this example for pentagons for Passacaglia rosettes, I want sewing lines but sometimes the lines are not necessary. If you are machine piecing a design that doesn’t have inset seams, you do not have to mark any lines on the fabric..

If the fabric design does not show clearly on the wrong side:
If you need to mark the sewing lines the way I do for Passacaglia pentagons and you have to work on the front to choose the designs, it takes a little more time because you have to move the template from the front of the fabric to the back and iron it into position again. It is an extra step but the results can be stunning with the right fabric.

 

Print on fabric with your Inkjet

In this example, the yellow diamonds are not fussy cut, so I just print those on fabric with Inklingo, rotary cut rows, stack the rows and cut several layers at a time. Ready.

 

Sew with a running stitch

The stitching lines are a huge advantage over acrylic, where the best you can do is mark dots through holes and then sew “Dot to Dot.”

This is the template method I teach in my Quilted Diamonds books (pre-Inklingo). Those books are an excellent introduction to hand piecing and the template technique applies to machine piecing too.

 

Passacaglia rosette (Millefiori Quilts)

TEMPLATES FOR FUSSY CUTTING

I think now you can see why I use FP templates WITHOUT seam allowances for fussy cutting—NOT shapes with seam allowances.

  • They can be ironed securely into position for greater accuracy.
  • I can have as many as I want.
  • I can have any shape, any size—anything I can draw on freezer paper!
  • I can choose a wider or narrower seam allowance.
  • They make it easy to mark the sewing lines, if I need them.

 

Passacaglia rosette fussy cut with Inklingo

Someone might try to tell you “You can’t fussy cut with Inklingo.” That is wrong!

There are TWO great methods:

  1. Traditional Swiss Cheese Fussy Cutting (above and Part 3 for POTC)
  2. Inklingo No Waste Fussy Cutting (print identical sheets of fabric, similar to Stack n Whack™, etc. Part 2)

Once you know how to use freezer paper, you will never need to buy acrylic/plastic/metal shapes again—whether you use Inklingo or not.

Freezer paper is inexpensive and does more than any other template material.

.

Introduction to Inklingo

This VIDEO on the Welcome to Inklingo page on the website explains how Inklingo works with your ordinary Inkjet printer.

SUMMARY
USE FREEZER PAPER TEMPLATES WITHOUT SEAM ALLOWANCES:

  • whether or not you are fussy cutting
  • whether you are using scissors or a rotary cutter
  • whether you are sewing by hand or by machine
  • whether or not you will mark sewing lines, crosshairs, matches, etc.
  • whether the shapes are curved or straight
  • with any shape, including new ones you dream up on your own
  • even if you are using English Paper Piecing

 

Inklingo Headquarters

Spring is my favorite time of year.

I have been sharing photos almost every day on the Inklingo Facebook page.

ARE YOU SUBSCRIBED?

Please subscribe to the blog and follow the Inklingo Facebook page for more.

This is an extremely long article but I think it is worth it. Freezer paper is one of the most important quilting tools available to quilters, and now you know even more about it!

Just in case you are wondering, I do not have any affiliation with freezer paper companies and I don’t sell it myself. It is a fabulous product. I love using it and I recommend all the time.

I hope you will also tell your friends about the new Inklingo mystery quilt, The Case of the Diamond Necklace (COTDN). There are seven clues so far.

Thank you for leaving comments and encouraging me to write more very long articles like this one.

Happy May!

Linda & Monkey

[]

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Main Beginner’s Page  There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon! 10 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo on Facebook

Fussy Cutting with Inklingo – Part 3

How to make Quilt templates

This time, let’s look at the second method of fussy cutting with Inklingo—templates!

Template Rule # 1 

Use templates without seam allowances.

It’s a beautiful rule. It applies all the time:

  • whether or not you are fussy cutting
  • whether you are using scissors or a rotary cutter
  • whether you are sewing by hand or by machine
  • whether or not you will mark a sewing line, crosshairs, matches, etc.
  • whether the shapes are curved or straight
  • with any shape, including new ones you dream up on your own
  • even if you are using English Paper Piecing

My first choice is always to print on fabric with Inklingo but there are situations when templates make sense.

This article focuses on fussy cutting but the info is helpful any time you need templates. I do not recommend EPP for any design but the tips below will help you with that too.

 

Use templates without seam allowances

Use templates without seam allowances!

If you have been using metal, acrylic, or plastic templates with seam allowances for Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses (or any design), you will love how much simpler and more accurate it is to work with templates without seam allowances!

I love anything that is simpler and faster with precise results!
(Especially when it costs less—almost nothing!)

 

Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses

In the POTC book, I recommend freezer paper (FP) templates whenever you are not printing the shapes on fabric with Inklingo.

Once you learn how to use freezer paper to make templates, you will never need to buy acrylic/plastic/metal shapes againwhether you use Inklingo or not.

If freezer paper (FP) is new to you, there is an article about it (what it is, etc.) under the Top Ten Tutes tab (above).

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Swiss cheese fussy cutting

TRADITIONAL TEMPLATE METHOD – SWISS CHEESE

The fabric above has holes all over it!

“Swiss cheese fussy cutting” can require a lot more fabric and it takes longer than printing identical sheets of fabric with Inklingo but it works beautifully in the right circumstances.

My first choice is Inklingo No Waste Fussy Cutting (see Part 2) but Inklingo is the very best method for traditional Swiss cheese fussy cutting with templates too.

 

Fussy Cut POTC with Inklingo

For example, templates are ideal for fussy cutting when:

  • you only need a few shapes from a particular fabric
  • you need ten or more identical shapes from several fabrics
    (e.g. Millefiori Quilts Passacaglia rosettes)
  • you don’t have enough fabric for Inklingo No Waste Fussy Cutting
  • you don’t have a suitable fabric for Inklingo No Waste Fussy Cutting

 

Yes to freezer paper!

FREEZER PAPER TEMPLATES
WITHOUT SEAM ALLOWANCES
ARE
 ALWAYS BETTER THAN ANY SHAPE
WITH SEAM ALLOWANCES

I have never liked using acrylic or plastic templates. They slide . . .  but the main problem is that they include the seam allowances.

If templates with seam allowances were ever a good idea (doubtful), it stopped being smart when quilters started using freezer paper more than twenty years ago.

 

FP template plus acrylic ruler

THE “AH HA MOMENT”
Freezer paper templates without seam allowances can be matched with any of your acrylic rulers, so you can rotary cut more accurately!

People who make templates don’t tell you this, of course. They don’t want you to know our little secret.

Buying acrylic shapes makes no sense if you have freezer paper and an acrylic ruler.

The photo shows how I add seam allowances around a hexagon template when I cut (one seam allowance left to trim), but it is the same for diamonds, hexagons, triangles, kites, Cleopatra’s Fan, Double Wedding Ring—ANY shape for ANY design.

FP + an acrylic ruler can be used for ANY shape!

 

Sew along a line

Which one would you rather sew? Dot to dot or along a line?

This is my main problem with templates with seam allowances—they add extra work and make it more difficult to sew.

The sewing line is more important than the cutting line, so it makes no sense to use templates with seam allowances. They are not designed to let you mark sewing lines on the fabric.

Sewing “Dot to Dot” is a heart-breaker. (No wonder hand piecing gets a bad rap!)

 

How to make templates

MAKE TEMPLATES WITH FREEZER PAPER

You probably have everything you need to make templates without seam allowances, so you won’t need to buy anything. (If you feel like shopping, buy fabric. You can never have too much fabric!)

  • freezer paper
  • scissors or a rotary cutter and mat
  • an acrylic ruler (for rotary cutting) (mark the desired seam allowance with masking tape underneath)
  • a thin ruler and mechanical pencil (for marking seam lines, if required)
  • 1/2 inch strip of paper (useful for spacing templates to allow for two 0.25 inch seam allowances)

Even in countries where freezer paper is not available in grocery stores (the way it is in North America), freezer paper costs less than other templates.

That’s it! Do you have everything?

 

Window template and no seam allowance template

For Swiss cheese fussy cutting, I use a window template AND a template without seam allowances.

FP templates are great when I am fussy cutting because they make it easier to ensure that I am cutting identical shapes but I love them even when I am not fussy cutting.

In this example, I printed POTC hexagons on FP with Inklingo. You could just draw or trace the shape from the book to make these two FP shapes.

 

Window templates for fussy cutting

STEP 1 – PRINT WINDOW TEMPLATES! 

First, I print the Inklingo shapes WITH seam allowances on FP and cut it into separate windows, as many as I need.

I cut on the stitching lines with a rotary cutter (or scissors), so I get a window template AND a template without seam allowances—two for one. (I’ll share my best cutting tips in a future article.)

 

Iron FP window templates in position.

STEP 2 – FIND A DESIGN YOU WANT TO FUSSY CUT

Check to see if the design shows clearly on the wrong side of the fabric. This is the case with many fabrics and it is helpful because we prefer to iron FP templates on the WRONG side of the fabric, so we can mark the seam lines. Working on the wrong side saves an extra step when we want to mark lines on the fabric.

 

Iron FP window template

STEP 3 – PRESS THE WINDOW TEMPLATES IN POSITION

On the ironing surface, press the window templates in position over identical designs with a hot, dry iron. Repeat until you have found enough identical designs. (It is usually okay to ignore straight grain to get the right design.)

In this example, I need 4 POTC hexagons, so I have 4 window templates. That’s another advantage over acrylic shapes. I can have as many as I want on the fabric at the same time!

I have some cool template tips to share in a future article, like marking “FP” on the paper side, so you don’t mistakenly touch the plastic side of the template with a hot iron.

 

Drop FP template in opening

STEP 4 – PRESS THE TEMPLATE INSIDE THE WINDOW

Still on the ironing surface, place the FP shape WITHOUT seam allowances into the window opening and press it into position.

Each identical design is now marked with two pieces of FP, the window and the center.

 

Inklingo fussy cutting

STEP 5 – PEEL OFF THE WINDOW TEMPLATE

Still at the ironing surface, peel off the window template leaving the template without seam allowances in position. Check the points/corners to make sure they are all identical. Re-press if necessary.

This template won’t move while I cut! Love it!

 

Rotary cut around template

STEP 6 – ADD THE SEAM ALLOWANCE WHEN YOU CUT

Slide a cutting mat underneath and cut around the FP, adding the seam allowances.

I have a few cool tips to share in a future article for rotary cutting and scissors cutting, so please stay tuned!

 

Mark sewing lines.

STEP 7 – MARK THE SEWING LINES (IF REQUIRED)

Still on the cutting mat, use a mechanical pencil and a thin, flexible ruler to mark the stitching lines, crosshairs and matching marks to imitate the results you get when you print the shapes on fabric with Inklingo (below)–fine, accurate lines.

This is the method I teach in my Quilted Diamonds books (pre-Inklingo). Those books are an excellent introduction to hand piecing but the template technique applies to machine piecing too.

 

Print on fabric with Inklingo

In this example for hexagons for Patchwork of the Crosses, I want sewing lines but sometimes the lines are not necessary.

For example, if you are machine piecing and there are no inset seams, you do not have to mark any lines on the fabric.

If the design does not show clearly on the wrong side of the fabric:
If you need to mark the sewing lines the way I do for POTC and you have to work on the front to choose the designs, it takes a little more time.

After cutting the shapes, remove the template from the front of the fabric and go back to the ironing surface to press it on the wrong side of the fabric (centered), so you can mark the sewing lines. It is an extra step but totally worth it for the right fabric!

 

Sew POTC with a running stitch

Marking the seam lines is a huge advantage over acrylic, where the best you can do is mark dots through holes and then sew “Dot to Dot.” I’m an experienced piecer but D to D is doomed to disappoint!

 

plastic and punch

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL QUILT SHOP

Quilt shops like selling stuff—templates, sheets of plastic, punches, special markers, etc. but when you learn about freezer paper, you won’t need those things.

Spend money on fabric and skip the stuff you don’t need—especially anything that adds extra work.

You will be a better customer if you finish your quilt faster and buy fabric for the next one sooner.

 

Passacaglia rosette fussy cut with Inklingo

Imagine how well this works for designs like Passacaglia, where you sometimes need TEN identical shapes for fussy cutting. You can have enough FP templates for each one, not just one or two acrylic shapes to slide around.

I cut several Passacaglia photos from this looooong article but I have more to show you about fussy cutting the shapes for it in another article.

 

The best quilt templates!

TEMPLATES FOR FUSSY CUTTING

I think now you can see why I use FP templates WITHOUT seam allowances for fussy cutting—NOT shapes with seam allowances.

  • They can be ironed securely into position for greater accuracy.
  • I can have as many as I want.
  • I can have any shape, any size.
  • I can choose a wider or narrower seam allowance.
  • They make it easy to mark the sewing lines, if I need them.

 

Fussy cut POTC with Inklingo

Please don’t listen when anyone tries to tell you “You can’t fussy cut with Inklingo.”

I hear it all the time but it is NOT true. There are TWO great methods:

  1. Traditional Swiss Cheese Fussy Cutting (above)
  2. Inklingo No Waste Fussy Cutting (print identical sheets of fabric, similar to Stack n Whack™, etc.)

Once you know how to use freezer paper, you will never need to buy acrylic/plastic/metal shapes again—whether you use Inklingo or not.

Monkey says, “You’re welcome.”

By the way, I do not have any affiliation with freezer paper companies and I don’t sell it myself. It is just a fabulous product. I love using it and I recommend to everyone.

Freezer paper is less expensive and does more than any other template material.

.

Introduction to Inklingo

This VIDEO on the Welcome to Inklingo page on the website explains how printing on fabric with Inklingo works with your ordinary Inkjet printer.

MORE FREEZER PAPER TIPS

This article got soooo long that I cut out several good tips for using freezer paper. I will share them in other articles. If you subscribe to the blog (top of right side-bar) you won’t miss anything.

ARE YOU SUBSCRIBED?

Please subscribe to the blog and follow the Inklingo Facebook page for more.

Before you go, review the list under Template Rule # 1—and then  tell your friends about freezer paper. I put that info at the top because it is so important.

I hope you will also tell your friends about the new Inklingo mystery quilt, The Case of the Diamond Necklace (COTDN). New clue coming soon!

Linda & Monkey

[]

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Main Beginner’s Page  There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon! 10 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo on Facebook