Inklingo on QuiltingHub 02

Inklingo Kaleidoscope Stars

I was pleased to be invited to write an article about how to get perfect intersections on Kaleidoscope Stars for QuiltingHub’s September Newsletter.

 

Inklingo on Quilting Hub

We’ve mentioned QuiltingHub on the blog before.

It is a great tool for quilters worldwide—just like Inklingo.

 

Inklingo Kaleidoscope Stars

You can read the newsletter online. (Click)

 

Print shapes on fabric with Inklingo

The 60° Diamonds 2 inch used for these stars were printed with Inklingo.

 

Inklingo Kaleidoscope Stars

The article includes my best tips for getting perfect intersections.

 

Inklingo Kaleidoscope Stars

You don’t have to register at QuiltingHub to read the newsletter, but it is simple (just email and password), and if you do, you can like, fan & rate your favorite brands, shops, and designers and suggest more!

 

Inklingo on Quilting Hub

We hope that means you will like, fan, and rate Inkingo’s page on QuiltingHub.

THANK YOU to everyone who has registered and rated Inklingo so far!

We love those 5 star ratings!

 

The benefits of QuiltingHub for quilters are described in the video.

After you like Inklingo, please make sure your favorite shops are listed.

Any registered user can make suggestions. It only takes a minute to make a suggestion that will help other quilters.

 

Inklingo Kaleidoscope Stars

Kaleidoscope Stars are s similar to Stack n Whack, Fussy Cutting and One Block Wonder as described on the blog in No-Waste Fussy Cutting.

Monkey and I hope you find the new article so helpful that you will give it 5 stars too!

ARE YOU SUBSCRIBED?

A new tute will be posted on Wednesday, so please enter your email address (top of right sidebar), so you don’t miss anything good.

Thanks for visiting. See you soon!

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon!  7 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo for Beginners

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

Kaleidoscope Stars – No Waste Fussy Cutting

Inklingo Kaleidoscope Star

BONUS TIPS FOR KALEIDOSCOPE STARS

In Wednesday Tute 13, we showed you our “no waste” method of fussy cutting with Inklingo.

We promised you a few bonus tips, so Monkey is back.

 

Inklingo - Cut the fabric smaller than the freezer paper.

1. You can cut the fabric smaller than the freezer paper (red arrows).

Normally I trim around the freezer paper at the ironing board because it is easier and faster, as described in our Top Ten Tutes: Print on Fabric – Best Tips.

In those illustrations, you can see that I usually only have to trim two adjacent sides because the FP extends beyond the fabric on the other two sides. It is a fast way of preparing fabric sheets for the printer.

However, if I need to, I can cut the fabric separately and then position it on the freezer paper.

It takes a little longer, but in this case I needed to save every little bit because although the fabric seemed to have a 12 inch repeat (as described in Wednesday Tute 13), after washing the repeat was closer to 11.5 inches.

I needed to cut the fabric shorter and leave a little space at the top (leading edge) and bottom.

Inkjet printers normally allow for 0.25 inch margins on the top and sides and 0.5 inch on the bottom, so Inklingo layouts of shapes do too. That means you can cut your fabric 0.5 inch shorter than the FP and still print everything you need on the fabric.

 

Sometimes you can save fabric by cutting it separately.

Since I needed to cut the fabric separately anyway, I decided to cut it a little narrower too. Instead of 7.25 inches, I cut it 7 inches and centered it on the FP.

 

Print 6 identical sheets for 6 pointed stars

Saving 0.25 x 6 might make the difference to get an extra row of identical sheets from 42-43 inch wide fabric.

By the way, there are other nifty tricks for saving fabric and using scraps and jelly rolls in the first chapter of The Inklingo Handbook which is included in the free shape collection on pages H5 – H38.

 

Print 6 identical sheets for 6 pointed stars.

I am careful to position the fabric exactly the same way on all 6 sheets of 7.25 x 12 inch FP.

As long as all of the sheets are identical, all of the stars will be perfect kaleidoscopes! (NOTE: That means you have to put the sheets  in the printer all facing the same way too, okay?)

 

Inklingo - Cut Rows - No measuring!

2. You can rotary cut several layers at a time.

This is faster than cutting with scissors AND it has an additional advantage when you stack identical rows because the shapes are already sorted into sets for the stars.

Remove the freezer paper from all 6 sheets. (It can be used again.) Cut each single layer into rows (above).

 

Stack the rows and rotary cut several layers at a time.

Stack identical rows, keeping an eye on the printed lines on the edges.

I find it too difficult to rotary cut 6 layers of fabric even with a fresh blade, so I generally stack and cut 3 rows at a time.

By stacking identical rows, the diamonds are already sorted into perfect sets for the stars. My portable kit is organized and ready any time.

 

You can see how I cut and stay organized in the video.

 

Inklingo Kaleidoscope Star

This method of printing diamonds for Kaleidoscope Stars has several advantages over other methods, whether it is called “fussy cutting,” “One Block Wonder,” or “Stack n Whack,” as described in Wednesday Tute 13.

 

Inklingo Kaleidoscope Star

The diamonds for all of these stars were printed on the same fabric with Inklingo.

 

Inklingo Kaleidoscope Star

There is so much variety that you might think there is more than one fabric involved.

 

Inklingo Kaleidoscope Star

Each one is a little surprise, but you know they will all look great together because they all came from the same fabric.

Can you imagine how long it would take to cut each diamond separately with an acrylic template?

WOW. Life it too short!

Please be sure to check the “Top Ten Tutes” tab (above) for more of our best tips for using Inklingo.

 

Inklingo Print Checklist

The Print Checklists will keep you organized and make the printing easier.

All of the steps are so fast and easy with Inklingo that we think you might take the time to fussy cut/fussy print more of your quilts. It can transform a beautiful quilt into one that will amaze everyone!

MORE WEDNESDAY TUTES

You can catch up on our other Wednesday Tutes too:

1500 ON FACEBOOK?

In the past two weeks there have been 100 new “likes” the Inklingo FB page. Conchita, Rosa and other FB fans have been busy! Thank you!

Monkey looks so happy when there are new likes! If you use FB, please help us get to his next goal of 1500.

We’re working on something new, so please subscribe to to get an email when we add to the blog (top of right sidebar).

See you again soon!

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon!  7 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo for Beginners

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

 

Antique Diamond Star Quilt – 02

Inklingo Fussy Cut Stars

If you’ve been following Inklingo on Facebook, you know I’ve been sewing stars on the front porch.

 

Print identical sheets with Inklingo.

I printed 6 identical sheets to get enough diamonds for 12 fussy cut stars.

 

Inklingo Fussy Cut Diamonds

It was so fast and easy that I printed 6 sets of 6 identical sheets to get enough for 72 fussy cut stars.

I rotary cut several layers at a time and voilà!

432 diamonds in 72 sets of 6. Zip, zip, zip. It doesn’t take long to print 36 sheets of fabric, especially compared to fussy cutting any other way!

The prep is so FAST! How could I resist?

 

Inklingo sewing kit.

There were so many stars, I needed an extra-special kit.

 

Inklingo Portable Sewing Kit

Monkey is guarding our treasure!

 

Inklingo Fussy Cut Star

It’s like eating peanuts.

 

Inklingo Fussy Cut Star

Each one is a surprise, a little gem.

 

Inklingo Fussy Cut Star

I slow down to “circle the intersection” to get a perfect match in the center of each one.

Even so, each star only takes about 10-12 minutes to hand piece.

I can sew 5 in an hour if I don`t stop to feed the chipmunks on the front porch.

 

Inklingo Fussy Cut Star

There is a two-part video on YouTube showing how I sew Kaleidoscope stars.

 

Antique Star Quilt

I am going to use these stars in a new version of the antique star quilt on Natalia Bonner’s Piece N Quilt blog.

When I analyzed the original quilt last week, I could see that 1.5 inch Diamonds from Inklingo would make a bed quilt about 79 x 96.

It is easier to make this design with Inklingo than with any other method.

Print, cut, sew.

The more I played with this old design and the more I thought about fussy cutting, the more intriguing it became!

 

Inklingo Window Template

The fabric I wanted to fussy cut looked better in the 2 inch size than the 1.5 inch size, so my variation of the antique quilt uses larger diamonds.

This fabric from The Kensington Collection by RJR should come with a warning label. I’m addicted.

TIP  If you are fussy cutting 2 inch diamonds and you can find a fabric with a 12 inch repeat, the Inklingo layouts are VERY efficient. There is almost no waste.

 

Inklingo Antique Star Quilt Variation

MY VARIATION OF THE ANTIQUE STAR QUILT

  • fussy cut stars (represented in green above)
  • emphasis on a secondary design of diagonal lines by careful placement of the gold, brown, and red diamonds
  • a unique edge finish
  • Queen size

Inklingo Antique Star Quilt

I decided to replace the hexagon made up of three diamonds in the antique quilt with one hexagon because I want the emphasis to be on the fussy cut stars and the diagonal lines of color. The design works either way.

I like the idea of letting the stars go right to the edge in that zigzag border.

With 2 inch 60“ Diamonds, this version is about 84 x 86, just right for a Queen mattress.

 

Inklingo Fussy Cut Diamonds

All you need is a front porch, a needle & thread and Inklingo 60° Diamonds 2 inch and Inklingo 60° Hexagons 2 inch.

HOW TO MAKE IT?

With Inklingo, you can sew by hand or by machine or a bit of both.

I love it when I can turn a corner at the end of a seam and keep sewing without breaking the thread, so I broke this design down into easy, portable units with lots of “continuous stitching.”

There is a cool way to organize and sew the “non-star” units, so stay tuned! If I can tear myself away from sewing the rest of the stars, I will write up my notes.

If you are subscribed, you won’t miss anything.

WEDNESDAY TUTES

There have been EIGHT Wednesday Tutes for Pieced Hexagons and FOUR Wednesday Tutes for Double Wedding Ring. Please enter your email address (top of right sidebar), so you don’t miss the next ones.

Inklingo on Quilting Hub

NEW on QuiltingHub! They have added a section for blogs, so Inklingo is listed on two different pages now. We don’t have any likes on the blog page yet.

Thank you to everyone who has liked the Inklingo page on QuiltingHub so far and for liking the Inklingo blog page on QuiltingHub too.

Annika has already listed her Stof Genoeg blog on QuiltingHub, so please like hers while you are there. We have!

You need to register on QuiltingHub first, but it’s just email and password. It is a very useful site. I think you will find it to be a great resource.

Inklingo Fussy Cut Star

FUSSY CUT STARS ON FACEBOOK

I have shown a few more stars on the Inklingo Facebook page. More to come!

Thanks for Natalia for letting me use her photo.  Be sure to see them all on the Piece N Quilt blog. I’m sure she would appreciate comments on her blog too.

See you again soon!

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon!  7 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo for Beginners

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

60 Degree Triangle Quilts

There are more than two dozen quilt and border designs in the new Inklingo shape collection for 60° Triangles.

Here are a few of them—plus a little tip about printing Custom Page Sizes.

Triangles and Half Triangles Only

This one uses 2 and 4 inch Triangles.

 

60° Triangles make fantastic borders.

 

Zig Zags are okay too!

 

With Hexagons

60° shapes are perfect for 6 pointed stars. This design uses Inklingo 60° Hexagons 2 inch with the 2 and 4 inch triangles.

 

I wonder if I should have reversed the colors on this one. It also uses Inklingo 60° Hexagons 2 inch with the 2 and 4 inch triangles.

 

Stars of Stars. Irresistible?

 

With Diamonds

The 60° Half  Triangles are more versatile than you might think because they turn hexagons into rectangular blocks for a setting like this.

With Inklingo, the diamonds are a great portable project, but then you can add the triangles by machine and assemble the quilt top quickly. We think that is “the best of both worlds.”

 

This is the same as the blue example except that every other row is dropped by a half block.

Inklingo gives you a choice of straight grain on the half triangles—either on the two short sides (used above) or on the long side.

Tip for Saving Fabric and Saving Time

Yesterday I had a question about the Suggested Custom Sizes in each shape collection and how exact they are.

Custom Page Sizes use fabric efficiently!

When I create the suggested custom layouts (example below), I allow margins of 0.25 inch on the top and sides, and 0.5 inch on the bottom. (Almost all Inkjet printers use those margins.)

There is a note about saving fabric (and freezer paper) in the first chapter of The Inklingo Handbook because almost all Inkjet printers allow you to set the custom size to 2 decimal places. This is what it says on page H45 of the free shape collection:

“You may be able to save a little bit of fabric by testing and refining the dimensions given in the suggested cutting layouts. For example, the suggested custom paper size may be listed as 5.75 x 9.25 but when you test, you may find that you can print on a sheet 5.55 x 9.1. The test page can be used as a template to cut more FP without precise measuring, and the FP can even be approximate, as long as the dimensions in the print dialog box are correct.”

What it means: It is a good idea to print on scrap paper first—just in case. You might not mind a few partial lines at the edges if it allows you to use a smaller scrap of freezer paper or fabric.

When you print your first custom page size, you can follow the step-by-step guide under the Support tab on the website. All you need to do is enter the dimensions in a print dialog box. It’s simple, so you will only need it the first time.

The Easy Way to Print on Fabric 

Inklingo is really as simple as finding the page of shapes in the PDF and printing, but there are little refinements like custom page sizes in the handbook. That is why the first chapter is included in the free shape collection for Diamonds/Triangles/Squares.

Have you looked at pages H5 to H48 of the free shape collection yet? It has everything you need to know about printing on fabric plus photos of Monkey.

There is also a neat tip about making large sheets of freezer paper from your odd scraps in the handbook on page H41, but I’ll let you find that one yourself, okay?

I hope you are subscribed, so you won’t miss our next message about 60° Triangles because there’s a free project file to use with Electric Quilt and more quilt designs!

Thanks for visiting today.

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

Inklingo for Beginners

Inklingo Quiz – Just for Fun!

Jeannette’s Kaleidoscope Stars Quilt

Look at what Jeannette did with one fabric and Inklingo diamonds!

Jeannette wrote:

I used the 2″ 60 degree diamond and half diamond and drew up the rectangular outside pieces myself. It measures app. 18″ across. I handpieced it. I’m looking for another piece of fabric to make another one.

I was so impressed with her quilt that I asked her for photos of the fabric she used and close-ups of the stars.

Luckily she was willing, and she had some of the fabric left!

Jeannette said:

When I went looking for the fabric there wasn’t a lot to choose from but I thought this was very pretty. The background fabric is the same tonings as the coffee table I wanted to put it on and it makes the stars stand out even more. I didn’t put one in the centre because I always have some flowers there. 

I love the close-up photos of Jeannette’s Kaleidoscope Stars!

1

2

3

4

5

6

Aren’t they gorgeous?

Just in case you missed it, there is more about Kaleidoscope Diamonds (aka “one block wonder” or “stack n whack” styles) on the blog:

There are more of my stars on the Inklingo Facebook page too.

Jeannette has helped me before. She is the Inklingoist who inspired the School House Shape Collection for her granddaughter Maddy. In turn, it inspired other grandmothers to sew with their granddaughters and grandsons!

You can also see Jeannettes Pie and Tarts quilt on Tilde’s Inklingo Projects blog. She fussy cut the shapes for that too. It is absolutely lovely.

Thank you, Jeannette. You are an inspiration to me in Canada—all the way from Australia. I wonder what you will do next!

If you leave a comment for Jeannette, I will make sure she gets it, okay? She is also in the Inklingo Yahoo Group.

Monkey says, Aren’t you glad you visited today?

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

Inklingo for Beginners

Inklingo Quiz – Just for Fun!

How to Hand Piece a Kaleidoscope Star – 1

  2 inch diamonds

If you are a regular here, you have seen my Kaleidoscope Stars before, but now you can watch me sew one! (Monkey and I love video.)

Portable Quilt Projects!

I print identical sheets of fabric with Inklingo diamonds and hand piece while I am on the go—in the car, in front of the TV, and in waiting rooms.

An exciting project gives me an incentive to be early for appointments.

By the way, if you are an Inklingo Affiliate, hand piecing is a great way to show quilters what Inklingo can do. You don’t have to be a genius to see how fantastic it is for machine piecing too.

Now, I have a new video setup, so I can let you see what I see when I am hand piecing.

Introduction to Hand Piecing – Click above to watch

I think “How to Hand Piece a Kaleidoscope Star” is the perfect guide to hand piecing, especially if you view it “full screen” or “large screen.”

Monkey says it shows you everything you need to know to start hand piecing in only 6 minutes! There is music, but no “voiceover” (audio commentary). Very simple.

Part 1 shows you: 

  • My tools for hand piecing
    (You already have what you need.)
  • Shapes printed with Inklingo
    (I showed you how to print identical shapes in a previous message. This is the same technique for “One Block Wonders.”)
  • How to make a quilter’s knot
  • A running stitch with backstitches—close up
  • Pinning in the crosshair at the end of the seam
    (I “pin” with a second needle to simplify my sewing kit.)
  • Sewing crosshair to crosshair
    (It’s not edge to edge like machine piecing.)
  • How to pass the needle through the crosshairs
  • “Continuous stitching”
    (This is the hand piecer’s version of chain piecing. I turn a corner at the end of a seam to sew another seam without breaking the thread.)
  • The relaxing nature of hand piecing—its “zen”
    (The music is Vadim Chaimovich playing Haydn`s Sonata No. 12 in G Major from MusOpen.)

Other Shapes?

The shapes are 60-degree Diamonds with 2 inch sides, but you can do exactly the same thing with the 45-degree Diamonds in the FREE Shape Collection and make 8 pointed stars instead of 6 pointed stars.

Part 2?

Coming soon! I just need to do a little bit of editing, so it could be ready later this week.

In the meantime, you might like to review these articles in the blog archives:

You can also search the archives for messages about fussy cutting, hand piecing, or any other topic. There is a Search box above the header.

Do you know anyone who wants to learn how to hand piece? I bet you do! I am also using this video setup for machine piecing, so stay tuned! (That means subscribe, eh? Right sidebar.)

It’s Family Day in Ontario, Presidents Day in the USA. I hope it includes time to relax and be creative wherever you are!

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

Inklingo for Beginners

Inklingo Quiz – Just for Fun!