Inklingo Quilters are Printing and Sewing!

From Canada to California to Mexico to Australia to France to Denmark and everywhere in between, quilters have been printing and sewing Inklingo shapes and making beautiful blocks.

I have permission to share a few.

Patchwork of the Crosses by Monica in California

Monica wrote:
“The 2 on the left were from Carrie’s Pieceful Gathering kits. The others I made up out of the fabric scraps I have… some of which didn’t really look like scraps until I fussy cut and put holes all over them!”

Absolutely beautiful work!

I love what Chantal is doing with the Silent Garden design. (Millefiori Quilts 3)

“I cannot resist to send you my first attempt with Inklingo. I have found a rythm….I am in a club and, although my “colleagues” are very traditional, they were all marvelled. I am sure some of them will do an Inklingo project next year. ”
Chantal in France

Amazing creativity. A first attempt. Très beau.

POTC by Beverley in Australia

Beverley has finished her POTC quilt top! She wrote:

“I’m so pleased to have found your way of piecing. I have almost finished my first inklingo project, a passacaglia quilt. So much more enjoyable than paper piecing!”

Absolutely beautiful work. I have shared more photos of Beverley’s beautiful quilts too.

Patchwork of the Crosses by Jytte in Denmark

Jytte in Denmark has shared dozens of her POTC blocks online, so you can see every detail.

Jytte wrote:
“My fabrics are reproduction fabrics, so they are older looking than the fabrics Lucy used, but they are so beautiful. Hope to finish the quilt some day – I use both machine piecing and hand piecing, just like you have shown in your book. And of course, I use inklingo.”

Jytte has captured the spirit of Lucy Boston with wonderful fabric choices. You are going to want to click on the link to see all of them!

Storm At Sea by Joyce in Ontario

Isn’t this amazing?

Joyce in Ontario has made two quilts so far with Inklingo. She wrote:

“The Storm at Sea was the first. I stumbled upon your site looking for Storm at Sea patterns and bought the 9” shapes. I had also been reading “Color Play 2″ by Joen Wolfrom and tried a colour combination outside my normal comfort zone. I really liked the results so my next two pieced quilts are also using your Inklingo method. I am enjoying the accuracy.”

I will share more photos showing detail of this amazing quilt and her Mariner’s Compass on The Inklingo Facebook Page too. What an inspiration!

ARE YOU SUBSCRIBED?
I have many more photos to share.

I hope you will subscribe and add linda@lindafranz.com to your contact list, so you can receive emails when there is something new like this on the blog.

Introduction to Inklingo

If you are new to Inklingo, this short video will bring you up to speed.

Starlit Star by Kathy in Mexico

I think Kathy must be planning an on-point star quilt this time. “This collection has so many possibilities..alone and with the other collections.”

SALE EXTENDED ON STARLIT STAR
I have been very busy on a special project, so Monkey is late with his reminder about the sale ending on Starlit Stars.

Starlit Star with fussy cutting

The special low intro price should end tonight at midnight (March 28) but we have extended it one more day. Starlit Star 12 inch

Print Diamonds on Fabric

Then you can print the shapes on fabric and sew! When you do, I hope you will share photos too.

Thank you for visiting today.

Linda & Monkey

[]

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Main Beginner’s Page  There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon! 11 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo on Facebook

Inklingo Storm At Sea Quilts on QuiltingHub

Inklingo Storm At Sea

Storm At Sea. Traditional, yes.

On the other hand, Pines & Curley have made a very elegant version with the same blocks called Ruby Sea and it looks completely different! It is featured in a new article on QuiltingHub.

Ruby Sea was designed by Pines & Curley in Electric Quilt for the Inklingo Love the Lines Contest in 2012 and the shapes were printed on fabric with Inklingo!

FREE ELECTRIC QUILT PROJECT FILE

Thanks to Pines & Curley, the article on QuiltingHub also includes a link to download the EQ project file.

Speaking of Electric Quilt . . .

Electric Quilt 25 years

There is a fabulous video celebrating 25 years since the introduction of EQ. Hint: Be sure to watch the whole thing.

Penny is one of my all-time quilting heroines. The contribution made by Electric Quilt in the past 25 years is priceless!

If you have Electric Quilt software, Storm At Sea block variations are in the Block Library, so they are ready to go.

Now I am sending you away:

This is an odd blog, don’t you think? Sending you everywhere else!

 

Templates for Storm At Sea Quilts

FACEBOOK VS THE BLOG—ARE YOU SUBSCRIBED? 

I post a photo or two almost every day on Facebook.
https://www.facebook.com/inklingo

I hope you will have a look at the photos I have posted in the past few days but the best way to stay up to date is to subscribe to the blog (top of right sidebar).

Inklingo on Quilting Hub

By the way, if you enjoy my articles on QuiltingHub, please log in and “rate” them.

Thank you for visiting! Now go, go, go!

Linda & Monkey

[]

New to Inklingo? Order and download FREE shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes.Main Beginner’s Page
There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon! 9 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

Inklingo on Facebook

Inklingo Diamonds Everywhere!

Inklingo Diamonds

DIAMONDS, DIAMONDS, EVERYWHERE!

Sometimes diamonds are obvious and sometimes they are tucked into unexpected places like Castle Wall and Storm At Sea and Feathered Star.

How to keep track of them all?

Good news! When I updated the Index of Shapes with the new diamonds, triangles and pentagons in Willyne Hammerstein’s Passacaglia, I also updated the Main Diamond Page.

TIP Any time you are looking for a shape, the Index of Shapes under the Support tab on the website is a great place to start. (You are on the blog now.)

 

Inklingo Castle Wall

WHY DO QUILTERS LOVE INKLINGO DIAMONDS?

There is a long list on the Main Diamond Page now!

Personally, I love Inklingo diamonds because they are so much fun to fussy cut and I can get perfect intersections whether I sew by hand or by machine.

Some things are easy, some things are difficult, and some things are free!

 

Inklingo Kaleidoscope Stars

EASY

1. It is easy to sew diamonds by hand OR by machine or a little of both, thanks to the precise shapes with stitching lines and crosshairs.

2. It is easy to fussy cut diamonds because there are two great methods–traditional and No Waste Fussy Cutting.

3. It is easy to get perfect intersections where many diamonds meet and there is a video to show you how.

4. It is easy to find the right sizes because all Inklingo shapes are named with the finished size and they are listed in the Index of Shapes (under the Support & Goodies tab on the website) and under the Shop tab.

 

Half Diamonds are Triangles!

DIFFICULT

1. It is difficult to cross-reference half diamonds because when we cut diamonds in half, they are not diamonds anymore. They are triangles. In many cases, half diamonds (both ways) are included with diamonds.

If you think you are looking for triangles, you might not find them. If you think you are looking for half diamonds, you might not find them. The best thing is to look under both Diamonds and Triangles, but I’ll keep working on it, okay?

2. It is difficult to cross-reference all the ways to use diamonds on the website! Luckily, you can keep sewing while I keep working on it.

 

8 Pointed Stars with the Free Inklingo shape collection

FREE

There are diamonds in the free Diamond Triangle Square shape collection and that is the best way to start!

 

Willyne Hammerstein`s Passacaglia with Inklingo

DIAMONDS ON FACEBOOK

If you have been following the Inklingo Facebook Page you have seen videos and photos of all kinds of blocks with diamonds, including Passacaglia and Millefiori Quilts.

You don’t have to have a Facebook account to see the photos if you click on that link.

By the way, just because you have “liked” Inklingo on FB does NOT mean you will see my photos in your Newsfeed, so please visit directly when you can. I hope you LIKE and SHARE too.

 

Print diamonds on fabric with Inklingo

SUBSCRIBED?
Facebook only shows my photos to about 20% of the quilters who have liked the Inklingo Facebook Page, so the best way to stay up to date is to subscribe to the blog by email (top of right sidebar).

By the way, I was finally able to get rid of the horrible ReadyGraph software that was aggressively creating duplicate subscriptions and sending multiple reminders. I apologize for the inconvenience it caused.

 

Millefiori Quilts by Willyne Hammerstein

REMINDERS

1.  Millefiori Quilts and the new shape collections for Willyne Hammerstein’s Passacaglia are at a special low price for a limited time only. 

Main Millefiori Page

2. Quiltmania is having a subscription sale too! Details.

3, Visit the Main Diamond Page—and let me know what you love about Inklingo diamonds too!

Thank you for visiting!

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon!  8 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo for Beginners

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

Inklingo on Facebook

Love the Lines – More of the Top 25

More TOP 25 Contest Winners!

As promised, here are a few more of the Top 25 designs from the Electric Quilt/Inklingo Love the Lines Contest.

Judge’s Choice

The designs were chosen for the Top 25 by the judge, Barb Vlack, EQ author and teacher. Thank you, Barb! Congratulations to everyone who entered!

The challenge was to use Inklingo shapes in Electric Quilt to design quilts you can actually sew!

Everyone who entered a design in the contest will be receiving the project files for these designs! (Don’t you wish you entered too?)

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Inklingo Dresden Plate Quilt Design

Pam Matthews’ Fluttering Circles

Pam used Dresden Plate Fancy and Winding Ways shape collections to create a beautiful effect. It makes me think of a magic carpet.  This is a design most quilters would not consider making without Inklingo!

Inspired by Pam?

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Inklingo Feathered Star Quilt

Erin Klein’s “The Color of the Sky, I’m Told”

Erin used several Inklingo shape collections very creatively and explains her design on the notecard. The fabulous border with 9 inch blocks is made with the shapes in the free Diamond/Triangle/Square shape collection. She also used Feathered Star and Circle shape collections.

Inspired by Erin?

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Inklingo Feathered Star Quilt

Anneke de Weerdt’s Valentine for Linda & Monkey

Anneke also used Feathered Star but she designed her curvy border effect with a different free shape collection—Circle of Hearts for appliqué. Anneke also provides very helpful notes on in the sketchbook. We love her valentine!!

Inspired by Anneke?

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Inklingo Storm At Sea Quilt

Elaine Stone-Arthur’s Waves of Color 

Elaine is very creative with Storm At Sea shapes. We showed another of her designs yesterday, and it did not look like a traditional Storm At Sea either. Wouldn’t you love to see this with many fabrics making up each band of color? It would be a great design for using up little scraps from your stash.

Inspired by Elaine?

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Inklingo Feathered Star Medallion Quilt

Kari Bauer’s Feathered Star Medallion 

Kari used Rose Dream, the free Diamond/Triangle/Square shapes, Feathered Star and the On-Point Triangles. She made the Feathered Star even more elaborate by designing a 9 inch block for the center, a unique feature of Inklingo.

Inspired by Kari?

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Inklingo Rose Dream Quilt

Carol Johnson’s Dancing in the Dark

Carol also used Rose Dream but set the blocks on point to get a totally different effect. She combined blocks with graceful curves with Inklingo Triangles, including Half Square Triangles (HST) and On-Point Triangles, plus the free Circle of Hearts shape collection.

Inspired by Carol?

It is hard to see the individual blocks in Carol’s design, so here is the same quilt un-colored.

Inklingo Rose Dream Quilt

You CAN sew these!

These are all complicated-looking quilts which are actually do-able with the cutting and stitching lines printed on the fabric with Inklingo. Check out the links under each quilt to see how.

Inklingo Rose Dream shapes to print on fabric

You can design with Inklingo shapes knowing that you can turn your dreams into fabric creations—whether it is Rose Dream, Feathered Star, Storm At Sea, or free shapes!

More Resources

In addition to the links above, the blog is searchable (box above the header), so you can find out more about the shapes you dream about.

Looking for more of the winners? We featured the Grand Prize winner and others HERE, more of the Top 25 HERE.

You’ve only seen 19 of the Top 25 so far! We’ll be back with the other six soon, so stay tuned. (You can subscribe in the right sidebar, so you don’t miss anything.)

Congratulations to everyone who entered. I am very glad I did not have to do the judging, because you made if very, very difficult.

Aren’t you glad you visited so you could see these designs?

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

Inklingo for Beginners

Inklingo Quiz – Just for Fun!

More LTL Contest Winners – From Top 25

Note!  If you have arrived looking for the movie “How to make Finger Pincushions,” click HERE for yesterday’s message and add your comment for a chance to win! (Then hurry back and see some gorgeous designs you can sew wearing a finger pincushion!)

More TOP 25 Contest Winners!

As promised, here are a few more of the Top 25 designs from the Electric Quilt/Inklingo Love the Lines Contest.

Only the quilters who entered the contest will have access to the Electric Quilt project files for the Top 25—a great prize!—but all of them will be featured on the blog.

There are descriptions from each designer in the EQ project notecards, but these tips will give you an idea of the creativity of these Inklingo designers!

Judge’s Choice

The quilts were chosen for the Top 25 by the judge, Barb Vlack, EQ author and teacher. Thank you, Barb! Congratulations to everyone who entered!

The challenge was to design with Inklingo shapes in Electric Quilt to design quilts you can actually sew!

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Kari Bauer’s Double Wedding Ring

Kari used the Double Wedding Ring shape collection and the free appliqué shape collection for Circle of Hearts. I love the dramatic black border.

Inspired by Kari?

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Inklingo Stars By Cathi Godwin

Cathi used several Inklingo shape collections very creatively! Many variations are possible with Cathi’s layout because she used 6 inch blocks.

Inspired by Cathi?

  • 6 inch blocks HERE
  • more 6 inch blocks HERE on the blog
  • dozens of 6 inch blocks HERE on the website
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Jo Moury’s Storm At Sea

Jo’s use of shading is impressive, don’t you think? She added Sunflower to her Storm At Sea!

Ispired by Jo?

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Elaine Stone-Arthur’s Storm At Sea

Elaine’s design is not obviously Storm At Sea, but this is probably the most versatile of all Inklingo shape collections.

(You can’t really trust me on that. I always see lots of possibilities with whatever shape collection I am considering at the time. LOL)

Inspired by Elaine?

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Christiane Wipplinger’s Storm At Sea

Christiane used Storm At Sea with 6 inch Yin Yang blocks for waves and boats! I would never have thought of this myself.

Inspired by Christiane?

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Anneke de Weerdt’s Feathered Stars

Anneke used Feathered Stars and LeMoyne Stars together. With carefully placed rectangles, she created an elegant curving effect in the borders. Wow!

Inspired by Anneke?

You CAN sew these!

These are all complicated-looking quilts which are actually do-able with the cutting and stitching lines printed on the fabric with Inklingo. Check out the links under each quilt to see how.

 

You can design with Inklingo shapes knowing that you can turn your dreams into fabric creations—whether it is Double Wedding Ring, Feathered Star, or any other.

More Resources

I have given you links to some of the pages on the blog and the website, but there are many more. Luckily, the blog is searchable (box above the header), so you can follow your interests!

Looking for more of the winners? We featured the Grand Prize winner and others HERE, and we’ll be back with more of the Top 25 soon, so stay tuned.

Thank you for visiting!

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

Inklingo for Beginners

Inklingo Quiz – Just for Fun!

Measurements of Half Square Triangles

Donna left a great comment on the last blog entry. 

“If I want to sew a HST to a side of a square, and I know the size of the side of the square (say, 2″), and I know that the diagonal of the HST has to be 2″ (duh!), what is the finished size of the HST going to be? Is there a formula for that?”

This is a great question. Yes, there is a formula, Donna.

We either multiply or divide, depending on which measurement we know.

The “magic number” is 1.414. 

Yes, really. 1.414.  I apologize.

In Donna’s example, the triangle would be 1.414 inches (finished), and it is available in an Inklingo shape collection.

Let me explain.

1.414 was discovered thousands of years ago by Pythagoras (left), and re-discovered by Monkey (right) when I was writing The Inklingo Handbook. LOL  Luckily, someone had invented a calculator in the meantime.

Inklingo quilters only need a passing familiarity with Pythagoras (born about 570 BC), his theorems, hypotenuses, and square roots. 

Just remember 1.414. That’s enough.

  Multiply or Divide by 1.414

Monkey says:

  • If you know the number should be bigger than the one you know, multiply.
  • If you know the number should be smaller than the one you know, divide.

If you know that B is 3 inches (finished size),
     to get A, we divide by 1.414.  A = 2.12

If you know that A is 3 inches (finished size),
     to get B, we multiply by 1.414.  B = 4.24

In Donna’s example, if we know B is 2 inches, we divide by 1.414, and A is 1.414. (That is spooky, until you realize that the square root of 2 is 1.414. Getting into deep water here. Quilters don’t need to know about square roots.)

When your calculator gives you the finished size, you can check to see if it is available by going to the Inklingo Index of Shapes (under the Support tab on inklingo.com).

2.12 inch HST? YES! Available! So are 1.41 inch HST. Isn’t that cool? Also 4.24 and 2.83 and others. Designs like Storm At Sea are chock full of weird measurements like this, but you don’t have to fear them anymore!

If anyone had told me 40 years ago how useful geometry would be to me now, I would not have believed it. Since Inklingo, Pythagoras and I are BFF.

NO MATH !

Hooray!  Inklingo does all the work for you. You just print precise shapes on fabric with your ordinary Inkjet printer. No measuring, no fuss. Perfect shapes. Even Storm At Sea becomes easy. (Get the design book—$10 or free!)

ANOTHER LOOK

In many cases, quilters start with the finished size of the whole block, and work backwards to get the finished size of the triangles and the square. 

For example, if you know you want the block to be 4 inches (finished),

     A = 2  

     A x 1.414 = B = 2.83

When we look in the Inklingo Index of Shapes, we see that the squares and HST are available in one of the shape collections. Life is good.

INKLINGO INDEX OF SHAPES

There are several odd-looking sizes in the Index of Shapes. Now you know why.

More resources:

Whew! Thank you, Donna, for a great question!

Linda & Monkey

PS Don’t forget to leave a comment HERE to have a chance to win a $25 Gift Certificate on Mother’s Day!

Inklingo on Facebook

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start  (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares  in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

Inklingo International Quilt Report

The web site is better than ever today, thanks to Inklingo quilters around the world. This is a report from Norway, Canada, Austria, and the USA.

     Norsk

Berit Hansen Gilde in Norway translated the Download Instructions and the Quick Start Guide into Norwegian for us! The generosity and kindness of Inklingo quilters is quite amazing. I am very pleased to have an authentic translation from the land of Norse legends, fjords, trolls, reindeer, and the midnight sun. Thank you, Berit!

Seven special Inklingoists have given me permission to add photos of their newest Inklingo quilt tops on the web site too. Click on each one to see a larger view.

Cathi in Toronto designed and hand pieced Cameron’s Windmills with one-inch half hexagons from the Inklingo One Inch Hexagon Shape Collection. If you haven’t already, you need to subscribe to Cathi’s blog, Quilt Obsession, and order her free pattern for Emma’s Butterfly Stars, which she made for Cameron’s big sister. Cameron is only a couple of days old and already has a quilt from Aunt Cathi. If we ask, maybe Cathi will write up how to sew this one too!

Deanna Ahern in Michigan has completed her Insanity Quilt Top with 10,339 tiny hexagons (0.5 inch sides). Yes, that’s right 10,339. She was inspired by a quilt on the cover of Australian Patchwork & Quilting. I wonder how many quilters have started this amazing, impressive design. Deanna actually finished it.

Jutta in Austria has made a spectacular Aunt Clara Quilt with the 90-degree one-inch hexagons (Inklingo Lite # 4).  This is the same shape collection that we use for Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses. I love the way the color dances across this quilt!

Kathy Timmons in Nashville is the absolute, undisputed Queen of Fussy Cutting. These are just two of the many Inklingo Feathered Star blocks she has made with fussy cut owls. The rest of Kathy’s Feathered Stars (and other amazing blocks) are in the photo albums of the Inklingo Yahoo group. “Seeing Kathy’s Stash in person” is on my bucket list.

Martha in NY lives on an island. Maybe that is why she chose Inklingo Storm At Sea. I have a feeling that Martha would be an artist at heart no matter where she lives. Her use of color is wonderful. You can follow her creative life on her blog, Quilt Contemplation.

Mary in Wisconsin has already made six 15 inch Feathered Star blocks. Some of Mary’s other Inklingo quilts have been featured on the blog before. I wish we could all be in Wisconsin this week to see Mary’s One Woman Quilt Show in person. For now, we have to settle for seeing the her Inklingo quilts online—here. Congratulations, Mary. We are very proud of you!

Sue Hodge in NY made this Rainbow Flower. It is the newest shape collection, less than two weeks old. Sue is a good friend and a longarm quilter. She has done a few quilts for me. Don’t you love the fussy cut butterflies and the curvy edge? Sue sewed this partly by hand and partly by machine—an Inklingo hybrid. (Click on the quilt to see the butterflies up close.)

Thank you, Berit, Cathi, Deanna, Jutta, Kathy, Martha, Mary, and Sue for inspiring us and keeping us energized.

Isn’t it wonderful that such talented quilt artists are using Inklingo to bring their designs to life? And that we can share all around the globe?

I will pass your comments along to these eight Inklingo friends. Thank you for visiting, from your corner of the world. Oh!—when you leave your comment, please tell us where you are, okay?

Linda & Monkey, in Burlington, Ontario
. . . Canada, North America, Earth, Milky Way
(Sorry, couldn’t resist.)

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start  (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares  in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.