Quilt Books (New and Old) to Inspire Inklingoists

cover Beyer

My copy of The Quilter’s Album of Patchwork Patterns arrived yesterday, and I am very glad I ordered it. It is a perfect source of inspiration for anyone who enjoys using Inklingo. I have used Barbara Brackman’s excellent Encyclopedia of Quilt Blocks for years, and I admire her contribution to quilt history. This new book by Jinny Beyer is destined to become a favorite reference too.

The book is absolutely gorgeous—hardcover, library binding, beautiful paper and dust jacket, rich color illustrations—488 pages plus two transparencies to help draft the blocks in any size. In addition to the instructions (clear, easy to understand), it includes several pages of historical information and a reference for each of the 4000+ pieced blocks. It includes traditional quilt blocks up to about 1970, plus about 500 more of Jinny’s own. There are 10 pages of hexagon designs too.

P1050382 monk open pages

For every block there is a small line drawing, but there is also a larger representation of the each block in color fabric swatches. The illustrations are computer generated, not sewn, but they are beautiful, and they are probably easier to understand than they would be if they were photographs. So far, I have found the index easy to use and I am starting to become familiar with the organization of the blocks into categories.

Jinny Beyer’s web site refers to it as a “master work” and I don’t think that is an overstatement. I pre-ordered mine last summer, and I feel lucky to have this book in my quilting library.

P1050383 three books

Barbara Brackman’s new Encyclopedia of Appliqué is essential too. These two legendary quilters/historians/fabric designers have made this a great year for quilt books! (No affiliation)

Like everybody else, I need more hours in the day to act on all this inspiration. I would like to sit and stitch, but it is time to ski for 30 minutes on the NordicTrack. Don’t feel too sorry for me. It is not a hardship because I can read while I ski, and I am only half way through Sandra Dallas’s new Prayers for Sale. So far, the story is compelling. It was published last spring, so yes, 2009 is a very good year for quilters who enjoy the best. (Brackman and Beyer’s books are too big for my reading stand.)

Speaking of the best, Monkey and I have yet another recommendation. If you haven’t read The Persian Pickle Club yet (1996, Sandra Dallas), you have a wonderful treat in store. I am enjoying this new one, but Pickle is my favorite quilt-related novel from Dallas—so far. I think I will re-read it (again) when I finish this one.

Time to ski. . .

Linda & Monkey

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