Inklingo Quilters are Printing and Sewing!

From Canada to California to Mexico to Australia to France to Denmark and everywhere in between, quilters have been printing and sewing Inklingo shapes and making beautiful blocks.

I have permission to share a few.

Patchwork of the Crosses by Monica in California

Monica wrote:
“The 2 on the left were from Carrie’s Pieceful Gathering kits. The others I made up out of the fabric scraps I have… some of which didn’t really look like scraps until I fussy cut and put holes all over them!”

Absolutely beautiful work!

I love what Chantal is doing with the Silent Garden design. (Millefiori Quilts 3)

“I cannot resist to send you my first attempt with Inklingo. I have found a rythm….I am in a club and, although my “colleagues” are very traditional, they were all marvelled. I am sure some of them will do an Inklingo project next year. ”
Chantal in France

Amazing creativity. A first attempt. Très beau.

POTC by Beverley in Australia

Beverley has finished her POTC quilt top! She wrote:

“I’m so pleased to have found your way of piecing. I have almost finished my first inklingo project, a passacaglia quilt. So much more enjoyable than paper piecing!”

Absolutely beautiful work. I have shared more photos of Beverley’s beautiful quilts too.

Patchwork of the Crosses by Jytte in Denmark

Jytte in Denmark has shared dozens of her POTC blocks online, so you can see every detail.

Jytte wrote:
“My fabrics are reproduction fabrics, so they are older looking than the fabrics Lucy used, but they are so beautiful. Hope to finish the quilt some day – I use both machine piecing and hand piecing, just like you have shown in your book. And of course, I use inklingo.”

Jytte has captured the spirit of Lucy Boston with wonderful fabric choices. You are going to want to click on the link to see all of them!

Storm At Sea by Joyce in Ontario

Isn’t this amazing?

Joyce in Ontario has made two quilts so far with Inklingo. She wrote:

“The Storm at Sea was the first. I stumbled upon your site looking for Storm at Sea patterns and bought the 9” shapes. I had also been reading “Color Play 2″ by Joen Wolfrom and tried a colour combination outside my normal comfort zone. I really liked the results so my next two pieced quilts are also using your Inklingo method. I am enjoying the accuracy.”

I will share more photos showing detail of this amazing quilt and her Mariner’s Compass on The Inklingo Facebook Page too. What an inspiration!

ARE YOU SUBSCRIBED?
I have many more photos to share.

I hope you will subscribe and add linda@lindafranz.com to your contact list, so you can receive emails when there is something new like this on the blog.

Introduction to Inklingo

If you are new to Inklingo, this short video will bring you up to speed.

Starlit Star by Kathy in Mexico

I think Kathy must be planning an on-point star quilt this time. “This collection has so many possibilities..alone and with the other collections.”

SALE EXTENDED ON STARLIT STAR
I have been very busy on a special project, so Monkey is late with his reminder about the sale ending on Starlit Stars.

Starlit Star with fussy cutting

The special low intro price should end tonight at midnight (March 28) but we have extended it one more day. Starlit Star 12 inch

Print Diamonds on Fabric

Then you can print the shapes on fabric and sew! When you do, I hope you will share photos too.

Thank you for visiting today.

Linda & Monkey

[]

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Main Beginner’s Page  There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon! 11 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo on Facebook

Encore Presentation of the Sixth LIVE Inklingo Video


I have edited the video to eliminate the first 15 minutes and uploaded it to Facebook—for a fresh start..W

There was an audio problem for the first 15 minutes in the LIVE video on Friday. This edited version skips that part.
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Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC)
The video is about Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses.

The demonstrations include:

  • Diana Boston’s book, The Patchworks of Lucy Boston (limited quantities available in the Shop)
  • a tour of Lucy Boston’s POTC quilt, close up
  • demo showing how to get a fast start by chain piecing hexagons from crosshair to crosshair by machine
  • demo of hand piecing, including sewing kit and how to move from one seam to the next continuously
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    Patchwork of the Crosses variation
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  • demo preparing the fabric sheets for printing
  • demo printing custom size
  • demo rotary cutting several layers at a time
  • demo English Paper Piecing Rescue, if you started with EPP but want to finish faster
  • demo using scraps of freezer paper and scraps of fabric
  • POTC quilts by Mary in Wisconsin, Kathy in Mexico, Fern in Singapore and Carol in Panama
  • my simplified variation of Patchwork of the Crosses
  • mini tour of the shape collection
  • mini tour of the website including the Main Lucy Boston Page (Shop)
  • mini tour of the blog, including the FREE EQ project files

<whew> We covered a lot!
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.Mary Quilt Show Poster

I showed Mary’s POTC quilt and gave info about the Quilt Show in Whitewater Wisconsin. but that was lost when I cut the no-audio section.

If you can get to Whitewater by February 25, you can see about 20 of Mary’s amazing quilts, and if you are lucky, you will meet Mary too.

Many of the quilts on display were made with Inklingo. Mary has been using Inklingo since 2006.
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The Dreaded Blue Screen
The Dreaded Blue Screen gives me the shivers!

During my rehearsals with the new equipment, I got the blue screen MANY times. Through trial and error, I learned that I had to attach the cameras and open each piece of software in a particular sequence to avoid crashing the computer.

Unwittingly, I did my sound test as soon as the mike was plugged in but I added more equipment afterwards and that seems to have muted the audio. If it’s not one thing, it’s another.
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Live Inklingo Video 06

I can avoid that mistake next time . . . but Monkey says, I’m sure to think of a new boo-boo.

SUBSCRIBERS ARE NOT GETTING EMAILS
Please tell your friends about the video because they probably did not get an email.

When I posted on Friday to announce the LIVE video, the email notification was only sent to about 10% of the quilters who subscribe to the blog. The website programmer has been working on the problem this weekend. It looks as if there is an expensive solution. <sigh>

 

Inklingo Live Video 06

I learned a lot doing this latest LIVE video. The new equipment is definitely better and the software is easier for a non-geek to manage. I am looking forward to doing more of these LIVE videos. If you want to know when, it is a good idea to check the Inklingo Facebook Page frequently.

Please remember that you cannot count on Facebook to show you anything from Inklingo anymore, even when you have liked the page. They made big changes in January to try to make me to pay to add my posts to your feed. Since these are FREE videos, I would rather not have to pay.
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Introduction to Inklingo

I hope you will share info about Inklingo with your friends. If you do, this short video is a good intro.

I still have to add Live 06 to the  summary of the other LIVE videos on the website. (Click on the Video tab.)

Thank you to everyone who has been watching live while I learn how to do all of this. See you later?

Linda & Monkey

[]

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Main Beginner’s Page  There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon! 11 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo on Facebook

Fussy Cutting with Inklingo – Part 2

There are two methods of fussy cutting with Inklingo.

1. Traditional – Printing templates to make Swiss cheese of the fabric.
2. No Waste Fussy Cutting – Printing identical sheets of fabric.

In this installment:

  • Choosing fabric for No Waste Fussy Cutting
  • Tips for printing identical sheets of fabric

 

Stack N Whack™

FABRIC FOR FUSSY CUTTING

The key to Inklingo No Waste Fuss Cutting is choosing the right fabric. If you get that right, everything else falls into place.

 

Fabric for fussy cutting

Any fabric that works for Stack N Whack™, Kaleidoscope Stars, One Block Wonder and similar techniques works for Inklingo No Waste Fussy Cutting.

If you have any of those books, the information about choosing fabric also applies to Inklingo.

 

Fabric for fussy cutting

Window templates are a simple, easy, reliable way to determine the suitability of a fabric for fussy cutting a particular shape and size.

For me, a window template works much better than acrylic shapes (and costs nothing!).

If you have a folding mirror, you might find it helpful to see the effect. When you get a little bit of experience, you won’t need the mirror anymore.

 

Fabric for fussy cutting

I can see great possibilities for this fabric! (No folding mirror or acrylic needed!)

If you use a window template, you don’t have to remember any rules but you will probably notice some common characteristics:

  • overall designs without a lot of plain background
  • medium to large designs, depending on the size of the shape
  • at least 3 or 4 colors
  • variety of lines
  • shapes with defined edges
  • high contrast

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Fabric for fussy cutting

FIND THE REPEAT

The next step is to find the repeat in the fabric. This is the same as Stack N Whack™ and other kaleidoscope techniques.

If you have ever hung wallpaper, you are familiar with this idea. A “repeat” is the measurement parallel to the edge (selvage) from one motif to the next, where the design starts over again.

In the illustration above, I isolated one blue flower. No matter what part of the design you choose, the measurement to the next identical motif will be the same, so you can choose any easily identifiable shape as your starting point.

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How to find the repeat in the fabric

MEASURE THE REPEAT

The length of the repeat will determine how much fabric you need.

For example, 6 repeats of 12 inches = 72 inches (2 yards).

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Fabric for fussy cutting

TIP  If you don’t have enough fabric to cut all the repeats along the length of the fabric, you can locate and use repeats across the fabric.

With many fabrics, you can use repeats from anywhere, not just along the lengthwise (selvage) grain. This can reduce the amount of fabric you need to buy.

It might also mean a favorite fabric in your stash will be enough!

(Stay tuned for another article with details for determining fabric requirements.)

 

Print identical sheets of fabric

PRINT IDENTICAL SHEETS

Are you ready for a little miracle? This is it! When you print identical sheets of fabric with Inklingo, you get sets of identical shapes!

In this example, I printed 6 identical sheets of diamonds for the Case of the Diamond Necklace Mystery (COTDN).

 

The Case of the Diamond Necklace Mystery Quilt

That gives me sets of 6 identical diamonds to make fabulous kaleidoscope stars.

For 36 diamonds for the COTDN mystery quilt, I printed 6 identical sheets of diamonds 4.5 x 8.5 inches. (That is one of the Suggested Custom Sizes in the 60° Diamond 1.75 inch shape collection.)

I cut off the selvage (as usual) and rotary cut a 4.25 or 4.5 inch strip long enough to include 6 repeats. Then I cut the strip into identical sections, iron to the FP and trim.

TIPS FOR PRINTING IDENTICAL SHEETS

Printing identical sheets takes a little bit more “fussing” but almost everything is the same as ordinary non-fussy-cutting printing. (Best Tips in the Top Ten Tutes)

For example, I always wash the fabric first. Always! Some say this will distort the printed design. That is exactly my point! If it is going to distort, I want to know about it before I invest my time and creativity!

 

Print identical sheets of fabric

My Canon printer is beautifully jam-free (another Top Ten Tute) if I leave about 1/8 inch of FP without fabric on the leading edge (red arrow).

If you have checked the Top Ten Tutes, you know that leaving the leading edge bare is easy to do for non-fussy cutting. I just position the freezer paper on the fabric at the ironing board with the FP overhanging a straight edge of fabric and trim the other three sides of the fabric to match the FP. (Best Tips in the Top Ten Tutes)

This step is slightly different for No Waste Fussy Cutting: To leave the leading edge of the FP bare and get identical sheets, I need to cut the fabric and the FP separately and then line them up. . . identically . . when I press them together.

 

Inklngo Fussy Cut Star

When I first started printing identical sheets of fabric, sometimes there were small variations in the diamonds. In the star above, you can see that the diamond in the 5 o’clock position is slightly different from the others. It is still a very pretty star.

 

Lucy Boston POTC

Not a problem? In some situations  variations add more charm for me than mechanical precision does. This is a fabulous example from Lucy Boston’s Patchwork of the Crosses.

 

Lucy Boston POTC

Lucy Boston’s fussy cutting often had variations—and her work is stunning.

In this second example from Lucy Boston’s Patchwork of the Crosses, the flowers are not positioned exactly symmetrically. In fact, if you look closely, they are not even identical flowers! I think I love it even more for its quirkiness. This happens many times in the POTC quilt.

 

Print identical sheets of fabric

This might be the best tip!

In situations where it is important that every shape is as close to identical as possible, there is a simple solution.

Before you print, double-check that the fabric is positioned identically. To do that, stack the sheets with an offset (above). Repeat for all four sides.

This simple visual check will tell you whether you want to re-position the fabric on some sheets to match the others.

If one sheet just will not match, you can cut another sheet that will—if you have enough fabric.

That brings us to a new topic for a future article: How to determine yardage requirements for fussy cutting. I have written about this before (and the blog is searchable). I have more info about using Inklingo templates for traditional Swiss cheese fussy cutting too.

In the meantime, I hope you are following The Case of the Diamond Necklace Mystery Qult.

The mystery quilt is very pretty without fussy cutting but I hope I have tempted you to try it!

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Introduction to Inklingo

This VIDEO on the Welcome to Inklingo page on the website explains how Inklingo works.

If you know anyone who is interested in learning about Inklingo, please let them know. The COTDN mystery is great for beginners AND experienced Inklingo quilters too. The clues for the Case of the Secret Garden (COTSG) and the Case of the Stranger in Margaritaville (COTSIM) are still on the blog, so you can see what to expect.

The new mystery is NOT just for hand piecers. There are instructions for machine piecing too.

ARE YOU SUBSCRIBED?

Please subscribe to the blog and follow the Inklingo Facebook page for more.

Please tell your friends about Inklingo. The more, the merrier!

Linda & Monkey

[]

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Main Beginner’s Page  There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon! 10 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo on Facebook

Fussy Cutting with Inklingo – Part 1

Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses

In the 1950s and 1960s, Lucy Boston was a pioneer of fussy cutting and she created fascinating effects with simple shapes, like her Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC), above.

By artistic use of designs in the fabric, she created masterpieces.

 

Fussy Cut Clamshells

No matter what the shape—clamshells, hexagons, diamonds, pentagons, squares, anything–there is a big reaction when I post fussy cutting on the Inklingo page on Facebook. It is a phenomenon on Pinterest too.

Surprising effects! .

 

Swiss cheese fabric

Lucy Boston acknowledged that traditional methods of fussy cutting are wasteful and that is not consistent with the traditional ideas of quilting—but we all love the look!

 

Lucy Boston Patcwork of the Crosses

The brilliance of Lucy Boston was the way she used the designs in the fabric, not her sewing method!

 

Inklingo Kaleidoscope Stars

Of course, Lucy Boston was sewing at a time when there were no rotary cutters (gasp), no acrylic templates (or plastic garbage floating around the Galapagos Islands), and very limited resources.

 

Print hexagons on fabric

Lucy Boston was ahead of her time, going where other quilters feared to tread, so if she was alive today, I think she would be printing with Inklingo, rotary cutting and sewing with a running stitch. The incredible selection of fabric available now would feed her creative soul!

 

Print hexagons on fabric

It makes me sad to think how many more exquisite quilts Lucy Boston could have finished if she did not use paper piecing! All those hours basting—and removing basting!

Stack n Whack ™, Kaleidoscope Stars, One Block Wonder and other riffs on this theme have become popular in the last 15 years or so.

Now, Inklingo makes it easier than ever to get astonishing effects with simple techniques.

TWO METHODS OF FUSSY CUTTING 

With Inklingo, there are TWO ways to get fabulous fussy cut effects!

  1. Traditional Fussy Cutting – by printing freezer paper templates to make Swiss Cheese of the fabric (The sewing lines are marked manually.)
  2. No Waste Fussy Cutting – by printing identical sheets of fabric! (The cutting and sewing lines are printed.)

 

Print identical sheets of fabric

Printing identical sheets of fabric with Inklingo makes fussy cutting more fun and saves waste! The effect is fabulous.

With either method of fussy cutting, you can use a rotary cutter or scissors and cut several layers at a time. No basting, no whip-stitching, no removing templates.

Stay tuned for more:

  • How to choose fabric for fussy cutting.
  • How to print identical sheets of fabric.
  • How to determine yardage requirements.

 

The Case of the Diamond Necklace Mystery Qult

The new COTDN mystery quilt is very pretty without fussy cutting but it is a nice small project, so we’re hoping to tempt you.

I hope you will subscribe to the blog (top of right side-bar), so you don’t miss the details.

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Introduction to Inklingo

If you are new to Inklingo, there are step by step instructions and VIDEO on the Welcome to Inklingo page.

Please tell your friends about the COTDN mystery too. It is perfect for beginners AND experienced Inklingo quilters.

ARE YOU SUBSCRIBED?

I hope you are subscribed here and following the Inklingo Facebook page for the clues.

I would love to see and share photos of your fabric choices too. linda@lindafranz.com

More on fussy cutting soon!

Linda & Monkey

[]

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Main Beginner’s Page  There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon! 10 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo on Facebook

Carol’s POTC in Panama

Panama-potc-IMG_5974

Carol in Panama has made some spectacular quilts with Inklingo, including Patchwork of the Crosses!

 

Patchwork of the Crosses in Panama

Her Patchwork of the Crosses is precisely hand pieced (not EPP) and beautifully machine quilted by Margaret Gunn.

 

Patchwork of the Crosses in Panama

Each block is a work of art!

 

Patchwork of the Crosses in Panama

Carol used some of her stash of Kaffe Fassett fabrics and named this one “Thoroughly Modern Lucy.”

 

Patchwork of the Crosses in Panama

If you are lucky, you can see it in person in the Jacksonville Florida Quilt Show in September!

 

Inklingo Alabama Beauty quilt by Carol in Panama

Carol is also entering her Inklingo Alabama Beauty quilt, made with the Inklingo Orange Peel Deluxe shape collection.

Carol’s Alabama Beauty quilt is her favorite:

“Technically that was the most difficult quilt I have ever made – the massive number of seams that come together in the center was a challenge. Mine don’t have any holes and they lay flat – no pooching up in the center. Frankly I cannot imagine anyone making that pattern without Inklingo.”

You can see Carol’s whole Alabama Beauty quilt and more photos on her Postcards from Panama blog too.

Carol is also entering her Inklingo Pie & Tarts and her mini Drunkard’s Path with Inklingo.

Margaret Gunn has high praise for the precision in Carol’s quilts—and who would know the quality of the quilt top better than the longarm quilter!

 

Hexagons for Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses

No templates! Print the shapes on fabric, cut and sew!

Printing the shapes on fabric with Inklingo allows Carol to express herself with color and get the precise results she wants in a reasonable amount of time. POTC doesn’t have to take a lifetime!

Congratulations, Carol! Your beautiful quilts are an inspiration to me.

ARE YOU SUBSCRIBED?

If you subscribe to the blog (top of right side-bar), you will always be the first to see what’s new.

We love it when you share photos of your Inklingo blocks and quilts on Facebook.

Introduction to Inklingo

The video Introduction to Inklingo explains the three key ideas that make Inklingo work.

Carol has introduced her friends to Inklingo and she has allowed me to quote her on the website:

“We agreed that we would never have become the quilters that we are today if we had not found Inklingo.” – Carol and Beate in Panama

Please share my videos on your blogs and Facebook and please tell your friends about Inklingo!

If you would like to learn more about Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses with Inklingo—and see the POTC video—please go to the Main Lucy Boston Page.

Thank you for inspiring all of us, Carol!

Linda & Monkey

[]

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Main Beginner’s Page There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon! 9 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

Inklingo on Facebook

Portable Hexagons – Part 3

Portable Sewing Kit

Everyone loves the idea of a portable project but the amount of prep can be intimidating.

There are at least 3 methods of preparing shapes for hand piecing.

A CHOICE OF 3 METHODS

  • All three methods of preparation work for traditional fussy cutting.
  • All three methods work for scrap quilts.
  • All three methods allow you to do some of the prep on the go.
  • The first two options allow you to combine hand and machine piecing in a “hybrid”, so you can have the best of both worlds. (Portable Pink Pieced Hexagons – Part 2)

We can always be ready to sew on the go! We love portable!

 

Print hexagons on fabric with your Inkjet

METHOD 1 – FASTEST and MOST ACCURATE

  1. Print the shapes on fabric with Inklingo (above).
  2. Rotary cut several layers at a time or cut with scissors.

Ready to sew!

If you run out of time, you can finish cutting the shapes apart with scissors on the go because the cutting lines are printed on the fabric.

Sew along the stitching lines with a running stitch.

Printing on fabric, best tips is one of the Top Ten Tutes (tab above).

Main Beginner’s Page (free shapes)

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Use freezer paper templates

METHOD 2 

  1. Prepare freezer paper templates (print or trace).
  2. Iron the templates to strips of fabric and rotary cut, adding seam allowances on all sides (above).
  3. Draw the stitching lines manually using a mechanical pencil to create crosshairs at the seam endings.

Ready to sew!

If you run out of time, you can finish drawing the stitching lines on the go.

Sew along the pencil lines with a running stitch.

This is the method taught in my Quilted Diamonds books and on the QD2 DVD. (Available again!)

This method is slower than printing the shapes on fabric but drawing the lines is still faster than basting to templates (and removing templates later).

See the many advantages of freezer paper over any other type of template material in this article on QuiltingHub.

BONUS TIP
Fabric pieces prepared with freezer paper templates can be used with fabric pieces printed with Inklingo. This is ideal in situations when you cannot print on fabric for some reason or because a shape is not available from Inklingo (yet).
Index of Shapes

 

Baste fabric to templates with glue or thread

METHOD 3 

  1. Use an acrylic template (seam allowances included) and rotary cut the fabric, several layers at a time.
  2. Baste onto templates (homemade or purchased) using thread or glue (above).

This is the most time-consuming method of prep because you are “sewing” each shape twice but if you run out of time, you can finish basting on the go.

When all of the shapes are basted, sew with a whip-stitch and remove the templates when all sides of a shape are joined.

 

8 Good Ways to Use Inklingo for EPP

8 GOOD WAYS TO USE INKLINGO FOR EPP

I do not recommend traditional English Paper Piecing for any design, but there are at least 8 Good Ways to Use Inklingo for EPP, if that is the method you prefer.

That means Inklingo is for everyone—whether you print on fabric or not! That includes:

  • quilters who prefer whip-stitching over templates (EPP)
  • quilters who prefer a running stitch
  • quilters who use scraps
  • quilters who fussy cut
  • quilters who want to print templates
  • quilters who want to combine hand and machine piecing

Isn’t it nice that we have choices? It is up to each of us to be familiar with the options and make the best decision for ourselves.

 

Maggie Smith sewing Patchwork of the Crosses

PATCHWORK OF THE CROSSES (POTC)

There was only one option in the 1950s and 1960s.

Lucy Boston did not have the advantages of freezer paper, acrylic templates, a rotary cutter, Inklingo, central heating, or microwave popcorn and she had to make do with a very limited selection of cotton fabric in post-war England.

She created 20 amazing quilts but it makes me sad to think that there could have been many more if she had had our advantages. Imagine what this artist could have accomplished with the tools and fabric we have today!

 

Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC)

POTC IS NOT JUST FOR QUILTERS WHO ENJOY EPP

Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses is not a book about English Paper Piecing.

It is about an incredible artist whose creativity flourished despite significant disadvantages.

The popularity of POTC is that it includes everyone!

When you take a hand piecing class, it is okay to ask the teacher if she is familiar with all of the options and to ask why she chose the method(s) she is teaching.

 

Portable Patchwork of the Crosses

LOVING WHAT WE DO

No matter which method you prefer, it is good to remember that quilters who piece by hand have more in common than they have differences.

Hand piecers are a tiny corner in the quilting universe but they love what they do just as much as machine piecers, appliquéers, and long-arm machine quilters love what they do.

 

No Waste Fussy Cutting with Inklingo

By the way, some quilters think you cannot fussy cut with Inklingo but there are two methods!

  1. Print shapes without seam allowances on freezer paper for traditional “Swiss cheese” fussy cutting.
  2. Print shapes with seam allowances on identical sheets of fabric for “No Waste Fussy Cutting” (example above). It is similar to Stack n Whack™—but without the stacking.

TWO methods of fussy cutting

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Patchwork of the Crosses by Fern in Singapore

If you missed seeing Fern’s POTC in Houston or Tokyo, you can see it on the Main Lucy Boston Page.

 

Print shapes on fabric with Inklingo

I’m going to print three or four more sheets of fabric for a few more of the 300 Pieced Hexagons and load up my kit again.

Don’t you love sewing on the go!

FACEBOOK VS THE BLOG—ARE YOU SUBSCRIBED? 

I post a photo or two almost every day on Facebook.
https://www.facebook.com/inklingo

Please have a look at the photos I have posted in the past week but the best way to stay up to date is to subscribe to the blog (top of right sidebar).

I hope you will feel inspired to choose 4 Pieced Hexagons from 300 Pieced Hexagons and prepare a Cheat Sheet (Part 1) and load up a portable kit because there is more to come . . .

Linda & Monkey

[]

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Main Beginner’s Page There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon! 9 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

Inklingo on Facebook

Hexie Love Blog Hop

I am interrupting our regularly scheduled program (Modern Baby Quilt) again with TWO pieces of news for Julia Wood’s Hexie Blog Hop!

Hexie Love by Julia Wood

ONE!  Julia Wood is self-publishing a new online magazine called Hexie Love, and you could win one free issue. ($5.99 value)

Julia has assured me that Hexie Love is not just about English Paper Piecing and I have agreed to write an article about Inklingo for an issue later this year.

Hexagons are not just for quilters who use EPP!

 

Hexagon Quilt Design Book

TWO!  I am offering the Inklingo Hexagon Quilt Design Book ($20 value, PDF download) FREE until midnight on Tuesday, April 14, so read on!

 

Print hexagons on fabric with Inklingo

Printing shapes on fabric with an ordinary Inkjet printer and Inklingo is a hexie lover’s dream come true!

There is fabulous hexagon inspiration everywhere these days.

However, if English Paper Piecing was the only way to quilt, I would probably not be a quilter at all—let alone gluing and basting and picking paper out of hexagons! I would have found another hobby.

I hear the same thing from Inklingo quilters almost every day. Gluing, pinching and whip-stitching is not fun for everyone and can be very hard on hands and wrists.

ENGLISH PAPER PIECING RESCUE

I often hear from quilters who are stalled on a project they started with EPP, discouraged by how long it takes. You can finish with a running stitch!

English Paper Piecing Rescue is one of the most popular pages on my website.

 

Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses

Lucy Boston has inspired quilters all over the world with Patchwork of the Crosses and other hexagon quilts. She taught herself to sew by mending clothes and old quilts. English Paper Piecing was the only method she knew.

The brilliance of Lucy Boston was the artistic way she used designs in the fabric–fussy cutting—not her sewing method.

The Patchworks of Lucy Boston by her daughter-in-law, Diana, illustrates and describes all 20 of her amazing quilts. It makes me sad to think how many more masterpieces would be part of Lucy Boston’s legacy if she had the advantages we have today.

 

Millefiori Quilts by Willyne Hammerstein

In Millefiori Quilts and Millefiori Quilts 2, the Dutch artist Willyne Hammerstein uses English Paper Piecing but says it is the least favorite part of the process for her too.

“Choosing a pattern, selecting the fabrics that go with it and piecing together a small part to see the result, gives me the most pleasure. Thereafter, my perseverance is tested. Quilting is not my favorite occupation.”

Do you admire all the hexagons you see in books and magazines and on Pinterest and other websites, but can’t imagine basting and whip-stitching your way to a finished quilt?

Hexagons are not just for quilters who use EPP!

I quilt for relaxation and to express my creativity. Life can be hard. I don’t need my hobby to test my patience!

There is an easier way to sew Willyne’s exquisitely complex quilts with hexagons, diamonds, pentagons and other shapes. Quiltmania understood that making the shapes in Willyne’s quilts Inklingo-able would make these stunning designs accessible to more quilters, not just quilters who EPP.

Last month we introduced two shape collections for Passacaglia, the quilt on the cover of Millefiori Quilts.

 

Hexagons and Stars with Inklingo

EPP FORESAKEN!

When a project takes so long that I lose interest and abandon hope of finishing, it creates feelings of guilt.

Bonnie Hunter of Quiltville is part of Julia’s Blog Hop too.  Bonnie stuck with her vision for her hexie quilt for FOURTEEN years, not including time to quilt it. Bonnie is an inspiration for all of us, but oh, my!

HEXIE LOVE!

  • I love hexagons, especially the 90° hexagons in Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses.
  • I love a portable project.
  • I love precision.
  • I love relaxing with a needle and thread for some slow stitching—a running stitch.
  • I love fussy cutting.
  • I love finishing what I start.

Hexagons are not just for quilters who use EPP!

I can sew with a running stitch instead!

There are at least two good ways of preparing hexagons for hand piecing which are faster and more accurate than EPP, so you can make wonderful hexagon designs in a fraction of the time.

 

Quilted Diamonds and Quilted Diamonds 2

1. Prepare the shapes with freezer paper templates and sew with a running stitch. This is the method I teach in my Quilted Diamonds books.

 

Sew hexagons with a running stitch.

This method of hand piecing gives you complete design freedom!

If you can print or draw the shapes on freezer paper, you can cut them apart, draw sewing lines on the fabric with a pencil and sew fabric pieces together with a running stitch. It is the same for hexagons AND any other shape.

I decided to reprint Quilted Diamonds 2 this winter—while hexagons are hot—because it can help quilters who are looking for an easier, more portable way to sew hexagons or any other shape, not just the diamond designs in the books.

Quilted Diamonds 2 DVD lesson

Every copy of Quilted Diamonds 2 includes the comprehensive two-hour hand piecing lesson on DVD. The lesson takes the mystery out of this simple, relaxing technique and includes all my best tips.

 

Video - Hand Piecing with Inklingo

2. Print the shapes on fabric with Inklingo (VIDEO) and sew with a running stitch.

Of course, this is my favorite method. Precise, simple, fast, portable.

Print, rotary cut several layers at a time, and sew! The video shows every step.

Hexagons are not just for quilters who use EPP!

 

 

VIDEO - Machine piece hexagons

Everyone loves the portability of hand piecing, but it is also easy to machine piece hexagons when you have the lines printed on the fabric.

I hand piece hexagons that are smaller than 1 inch and machine piece the larger sizes. I also like to combine hand and machine piecing in the same quilt, a hybrid.

I hand piece when I need portability and machine piece for speed.

 

Inklingo Pieced Hexagons Video

The same hand piecing and machine sewing techniques also work for 300 Pieced Hexagon designs (video above) and for fussy cutting.

 

8 Good Ways to Use Inklingo for EPP

8 GOOD WAYS

On the other hand, if you do enjoy English Paper Piecing, there are 8 Good Ways to Use Inklingo for EPP. 8 Good Ways on QuiltingHub.

In addition to the flexibility of printing your own templates and choosing your own perfect template material, Inklingo includes illustrated yardage requirements and TWO wonderful methods for fussy cutting!

 

Print circles on fabric with Inklingo

FOLDED CIRCLES

If you use Julia Wood’s method of folding fabric circles into a hexagon shape, you can skip the tracing and print circles on fabric with Inklingo instead!

Hexagons made from folded circles are pretty thick, so you will want BIG circles. A three-inch fabric circle folds into a hexagon with sides less than 1 inch (comparison above), so instead of cutting 225-250 hexagons from a yard of fabric, you only get about 120.

 

Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses POTC

1. Leave a comment to enter to win an issue of Hexie Love.

I will be posting more hexie photos on Pinterest and Facebook during Julia’s Blog Hop, but the winner of the copy of Hexie Love from Julia Wood will be chosen from comments left below—not anywhere else.

Comments on Blog Lovin or other blog readers or on Facebook or anywhere else will not be in the draw. Please comment on this page to be included.

 

Inklingo Hexagons, sewn with a running stitch

2. Order the Hexagon Quilt Design Book—free. 
Order on the website.

Tell your friends!

Normally any Inklingo design book is only free when you buy the related Inklingo shapes.

If you already have the Hexagon Quilt Design Book, there is no need to order again.

After midnight on Tuesday, April 14, the Hexagon Quilt Design Book will go back to $10—or free when you buy a related shape collection. (Details – 60° hexagons, 90° hexagons for POTC, shapes for Willyne Hammerstein’s Passacaglia, Colonial Garden or Periwinkle Octagon).

 

Inklingo Pieced Hexagons

THE BLOG HOP CONTINUES!

For more information on Hexie Love Magazine and Julia’s books about folding circles into hexagons, please visit Julia’s Blog.

Visit these links for more chances to win!

April 6  Bonnie Hunter http://quiltville.blogspot.ca/2015/04/hexie-love-e-magazine-give-away.html
April 7  Catherine Redford http://catherineredford.com/hexie-love-blog-hop/
April 8  Linda Franz http://www.lindafranz.com/blog/hexie-love-blog-hop/  (me)
April 9  Cheryl Sleboda http://muppin.com/wordpress/index.php/blog/
April 10 Geta Grama  http://cadouri-din-inima.blogspot.com
April 11  Victoria Findlay Wolfe http://bumblebeansinc.blogspot.com
April 12 Becky Campbell  https://www.facebook.com/sewforeverquiltingbybeckycampbell
April 13 Joan Shay https://www.facebook.com/joan.mooreshay

 

Inklingo Modern Baby Quilt

ARE YOU SUBSCRIBED?

I will write more soon about the Modern Baby quilt design you can make with the new Inklingo for Quilted Diamonds shape collection.

I post one or two photos on Facebook every day, but Facebook only shows my photos to about 20% of the quilters who have “liked” the Inklingo Facebook Page, so the best way to stay up to date is to subscribe to the blog (top of right sidebar).

 

Print hexagons on fabric with Inklingo

REMINDERS

I will keep the special sale price of $15 on the  new Inklingo for Quilted Diamonds shape collection for a few more days, okay? Main Quilted Diamonds Page

There are FAQ about Quilted Diamonds on the blog and you can see my first Modern Baby Quilt designs too.

I will be sharing more photos on the Inklingo Facebook page. If you are on Facebook, please “like” and “comment” and “share” my photos. It spreads a nice friendly feeling!

I’m looking forward to reading your comments about hexagons. Good luck in the draw!

Linda & Monkey

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New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

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